Open Source Marketer http://opensourcemarketer.com Online Marketing Tools and Tips Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:02:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Open Source Marketer pulls the curtain back on how to use technology to market your business online. Each week we talk with experts in the fields of design, marketing, technology, and business to reveal the best advice they have to offer. Charles McKeever clean Charles McKeever charles.mckeever@gmail.com charles.mckeever@gmail.com (Charles McKeever) Open Your Business To New Opportunities internet marketing, app marketing, business advice Open Source Marketer http://opensourcemarketer.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/osm-podcast-cover-art.jpg http://opensourcemarketer.com Weekly Global Content Marketing with Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer for Cloudwords http://opensourcemarketer.com/12526/global-content-marketing/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12526/global-content-marketing/#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:10:19 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12526

Have you ever used Google Translate to convert website content from one language to another? I have and while Google does an amazing job of attempting translation, I just didn’t know enough about the language and cultural differences to know if the translation accurate or unintentionally offensive. Now imagine doing that on a much larger scale in multiple languages across multiple cultures. Things would go bad very quickly. Well, today’s guest is Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer for Cloudwords, a Marketing Globalization Cloud. It takes all of a business’s marketing material and automatically prepares it for use in any other...

The post Global Content Marketing with Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer for Cloudwords appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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Have you ever used Google Translate to convert website content from one language to another? I have and while Google does an amazing job of attempting translation, I just didn’t know enough about the language and cultural differences to know if the translation accurate or unintentionally offensive. Now imagine doing that on a much larger scale in multiple languages across multiple cultures. Things would go bad very quickly.

Well, today’s guest is Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer for Cloudwords, a Marketing Globalization Cloud. It takes all of a business’s marketing material and automatically prepares it for use in any other locality – regardless of language and local customs – and with complete attention to brand guidelines.

During our conversation, Heidi explains how to expand your global reach, avoid costly communication mistakes, and increase the productivity of your marketing team using Cloudword’s streamlined team communication dashboard.

Here’s the full transcript:

Welcome back to Open Source Marketer. I’m your host, Charles McKeever.

Today’s topic is global communications. We’re going to talk about avoiding miscommunication in marketing and how to properly communicate in other geographic regions.

Joining me today to talk about this is Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer of CloudWords – the marketing globalization company that takes all of your marketing materials and automatically prepares them for use in other localities.

So, Heidi, thank you for joining me today.

HEIDI LORENZEN: Thank so much for having me, Charles.

CHARLES: You know, this is a really interesting topic to me because I’ve had personal experience with these types of situations where you’re trying to hit a market that’s not necessarily within your sphere of comfort and you’re trying to get all the materials translated and message things correctly and stuff like that. But my two experiences with it have been working with an outside resource – someone who translated something for me and then gave it to me and I didn’t really know what it said but I knew where it was supposed to go – and then, the other one was, you know, I’m a little embarrassed to admit, taking and putting something into Google Translate and then hoping that it was correct and then putting it out there and sharing it with the world.

So, let’s talk about CloudWords. What do you guys do and how is that experience different than what I’ve experienced?

HEIDI: Yeah. So, CloudWords was created to focus on the needs of folks like yourself – those who are actually in a position of needing to get their content into other markets and wanting to maintain global brand integrity, wanting to do it faster, wanting to do it more efficiently, et cetera.

Up until CloudWords was introduced on the scene, the translation industry was dominated by the translation service providers. They were creating efficiencies for the translators. It’s still a very important piece of the process. But nobody was really thinking about the needs of the marketer and, you know, globalization is just a must-do now. You know, it’s not a nice-to-have. You know, the world is flat ten years ago, and even then, if somebody spent a lot of time overseas, I thought that was already old news – that was really old news.

So, you know, if a marketer is not thinking consistently about “how am I optimizing growth for my company across the world?” they are leaving money on the table and they’re not really, you know, doing their company the full service that they can be. So, CloudWords aims to kind of address it from that perspective, building in the efficiencies that will allow marketers to do all of the marketing that they want much easier, much more simply, for less effort on their part as well as, you know, less financial resources.

CHARLES: Yeah, I know exactly what you’re saying because it doesn’t really matter what space you’re in. I mean, I’ve talked to people who are doing online marketing and who have a product or service and they’re just trying to hit another market or even app developers who are most comfortable in their native language but then, when they look at the market of people who are downloading their apps, they’re like, “Well, my apps get downloaded in Brazil or Germany or France or whatever,” and they know that, if they could target that market better, they could make more money off the same effort, the same level of effort that they’d put in to developing the app.

So, yeah, exactly – knowing that you can reach a much broader audience is really important.

So, give us kind of an overview of how CloudWords works. It’s a tongue twister, isn’t it? You had said something a moment ago that kind of piqued my interest – “efficiencies.” How is that more efficient?

HEIDI: Yeah, there are a couple of ways that we directly impact that.

So, anyone who’s done any sort of translation, especially if it’s a larger company, you know there are a lot of stakeholders. There are the corporate marketers, there are the marketers in all the regions, there are the translation service providers that you work with. And, very often, there are multiple versions of those across the world because everybody’s got their favorite because, you know, the right translator for their particular language, content type, et cetera.

And all of your content lives in all sorts of places, right? Some content is going to sit on somebody’s desktop, some content is going to sit in the marketing automation platform, some is going to be in your web CMS. So, it’s existing in all of these places and you have all these stakeholders. Another stakeholder are the reviewers which is an important part of the translation process.

As you were saying, sometimes you’d get something back and you just don’t know, “Is this right? Am I going to be saying really wrong things to my market?” and so you need to have somebody with local knowledge of not just linguistically, is it accurate, but is it right for that particular market? You know, Chinese in Taiwan is different than Chinese in Hong Kong is different from Chinese in mainland China.

CHARLES: Right.

HEIDI: So, you’ve got all these reviewers, you’ve got all the stakeholders, you’ve got all these technology platforms that are hosting your content. And so, what CloudWords does is, first of all, on the people side, we offer an opportunity for the team to collaborate a plan around what is going to be done in localization – whether it’s specific projects or whole campaigns which is very often the case for marketers. You know, you’ll develop a campaign with multiple pieces so the collaboration is one piece.

Then, we automate the entire workflow. Once somebody has the content that needs to be translated, it automatically gets sent off to the translation service provider and then it triggers those off for them so that they know they’ve got something to do and it keeps them on time. And then, when that’s done, it’ll go to the reviewer and then whatever steps. You can customize all of the steps within CloudWords – you know, whatever you need to do within your company.

Whatever those steps are, they’re all automated and alerts are sent out if somebody hasn’t done something. It’s very clear what your tasks are. That’s a huge piece of the efficiency creation.

And then, another piece that can sometimes even be more dramatic is that we integrate with the technologies that marketers are using. So, if they have developed an email campaign and a landing page with all the forms and everything in their automation platform – you know, like Marketo or (00:07:29 unclear) – that sucks the content out from there and then, after it’s translated, automatically goes right back into their marketing automation platform in the format, in the template, that they’re preselected. And so, sometimes, France may have a different template than Japan, et cetera.

And so, what marketers had to do previously was they’d be emailing their content off to the translator, they’d get it back, and they’d be copying and pasting it back into each template and that just takes hours. I mean, we had a customer tell us that, since starting CloudWords, I mean, they’ve gained back literally 50 percent of their day.

CHARLES: Wow.

HEIDI: And it is really dramatic. I mean, most people just don’t even recognize how challenging localization can be. They just think, “Oh, yeah, that’s something I’ll just check off the list.” But it’s a very intense process. So, that’s another way to create the efficiencies.

CHARLES: Those types of things sound simple enough. I’ll just send it to somebody and they’ll send it back and I’ll copy-paste it, you know? That’s the way that people like to think of things. But the multiple steps and the communication and all of the things that you just mentioned, those add up. Then, the next thing you know, you look up and your whole day is gone.

HEIDI: Right. And you do that for ten languages which is not uncommon for most companies. So, you know, repeat what you just said ten times.

CHARLES: Right.

HEIDI: So, yeah, there’s a lot there.

CHARLES: Okay. Before we move on, I want to move on to sort of the intrinsic costs of not doing this efficiently. But before we leave that, I want to talk about, it sounds like there’s a funnel there for being able to put the content in and have it managed and have everything automated and stuff like that and then be able to have it sort of end-to-end from the beginning of the project, all the way down to the email templates and things like that. Is it still necessary to have a person in your office who is familiar with the language? Who is familiar with the customs of the locality? Is that still a requirement?

HEIDI: Well, I would always say that it’s best to have someone who doesn’t have to be on your team. You can leverage an in-market partner. You know, sometimes companies will work with PR agencies or other agencies overseas to make sure they’re looking at it. So, I’m a proponent that it’s always best to do that.

Now, many of our customers have gotten to the point though that, with their translation service providers that they’re working with, that they’ve gotten to know their business so well that they get to the point where they really know, you know, “This will be fine when we get it back.”

The other thing that CloudWords offers is a big part of ensuring the quality of the translation. There’s something called “translation memory” and most people haven’t even heard of that. In fact, we did a survey of marketers and 80 percent had never heard of it. I spent ten years of my career overseas, worked behind a lot of vocalization projects, and before joining CloudWords, I had never even heard of it.

What translation memory is it’s a repository of all of the words, phrases, et cetera – strings of content as they’re called – that you’ve already translated and, if you’ve already translated them once, it means that you never have to translate them again so you never have to pay to have those words translated again and you never have to wait the extra time and you can also ensure the quality. So, you know, “Okay. This is the correct way of translating X.” But you know it will also be translated that way going forward.

CHARLES: So, I’ll imagine a good example of that would be your tagline for your company. You know, it never changes so, therefore, you know that’s also translated correctly.

HEIDI: That’s correct. And the other thing Cloudwords centrally hosts a company’s glossary and style guide so any translation service provider that you’re working with would access that same content all the time and, therefore, be able to keep everything they do on brand, on message, et cetera.

CHARLES: Okay. All right. Yeah, I can see how that right there would make it more efficient because it would bring in, you know, just being able to not have to redo something over and over again.

Okay. I know that I saw on the website, there’s a bidding process. So, take us through how that process works, of how bidding works, and let’s also talk about, you know, the hidden costs of not doing this right.

HEIDI: Yeah, sure.

So, on the bidding process, typically, what marketers will do is they’ll send out bids to different translation service providers saying, “Hey! I need to have this content translated. How much is it going to cost? When can you have it back to me?” et cetera. They’ll get back a bunch of different quotes that will not always be apples to apples, but they would compare and then make a decision, “Okay. I want to go with this translation service provider.” But, again, it’s a very manual process and also not on par – not apples to apples.

So, what Cloudwords does is we automate that process so we just put in what you need to have translated. You just check off the boxes that the translation service providers that you’d like to send it to and you can send it to the ones that you love and have already been working with, and you can also find additional translation service providers, if you’d like, in our marketplace of service providers. And so, you can send this out to bid and then, automatically, the bids would come back and they would all be each aspect of the bid – the price of the work, the total cost, the time frame, all of that – you can compare line by line against each other and make the best decision.

Now, typically, we find there are customers who do get significant savings this way, and you don’t necessarily always want or need to take the lowest cost bidder. It’s not always all about price. You need other considerations. You know, experience with certain content types or languages or whatever other factors. But, regardless, you then get to see and make those choices yourself of what really matters for you. We have one very large global brand – perhaps one of the most visibly recognized global brands in the world – who, when they started using Cloudwords, they discovered that they were not being charged market rate for their localization. Just by going through this bidding process, they reduced costs by 30 percent of just the hard cost of the translation.

Again, it’s not always about cost, but there is a lot of inefficiency. $34 billion a year last year was spent by global corporations on localization and that’s a lot of money that’s being thrown at a process that typically has been very inefficient. So, whether you’re creating efficiencies on the time side or the money side, you’re talking about a big savings.

CHARLES: It’s funny that we tend to show up and think that this is just the way things are just because, you know, we discover the process and we learn all the players and then, regardless of the topic, we think, “Well, that’s it.” And, as you’re saying, reshuffling the deck on that process and saying, “Okay, look, we can do this more efficiently, can lower the cost and not necessarily sacrifice the quality,” I think that’s genius. I know, in the past, I’ve gone through and submitted the exact same document to several translation services – online translation services – just to see what I would get back as far as quality and very different results across the board. So, being able to pull that into one place and know that you’re going to be able to get a good quality product and that you’re going to be able to know what your costs are upfront, that’s great.

HEIDI: Yeah.

CHARLES: Let’s talk about the automation part of this because I know that the part that I’m really interested in is kind of the workflow of things and also I want to talk to you about the collaboration piece because, you know, it’s not just about you or me. It’s about the people that we have to communicate with. So, tell us about that.

HEIDI: Yeah, and that’s actually ties to the cost. You referenced earlier the hidden costs. So, these costs that are most visible are the translation costs and so, you know, obviously, improving that helps. But, if you’re having a lot of marketers around the world spending a lot of their day in the tedium of copying and pasting content and sending emails and managing this entire process by what usually is Excel spreadsheets, you know, it’s kind of really 1990s type of technology.

CHARLES: Well, now they’re in Google, right? So, now they’re more efficient.

HEIDI: Yes, exactly. Yes, oh, yes, precisely. Oh, modern days!

So, that is a hidden cost that people just don’t think about in this process and so that’s why the automation is so important because, if you’re moving the process along much faster, you’re ultimately able – as a marketer – to probably run more campaigns, probably run more creative and effective campaigns, and reach more markets. And, if you’re doing that, that hits upon the other – what I would call – “hidden costs of localization” if you’re not doing it right.

If you’re putting up with the old, slow, inefficient processes, you’re probably coping by not localization as much as you want or communicating in headquarter language and I’ve seen that done more often than I care to admit. If you’re not doing all those, there’s a huge opportunity cost with that. You’re not going to be fully helping your company grow in a given market if you’re not marketing enough or well – or at all – in those markets. So, those are the opportunity costs.

Going back to the workflow and the efficiencies, typically, I’d say an average time to market savings that we offer our customers is about 60 percent meaning that, you know, we have one customer, for example, Coupa Software who was a typical localization project. It was taking them over six months – six to ten months actually in some instances – and, after Cloudwords, it was down to three to six weeks.

CHARLES: Wow.

HEIDI: And so, you think about that in terms of market impact, right? Let’s say you have a product launch or whatever message it is that you want to get out to the market. If you’re getting it out three weeks from today versus ten months from today, you know, that’s almost a year’s worth of B2B lead generation and just consumer purchases and whatnot. So, it’s a lot of missed revenue and a lot of money left on the table.

CHARLES: I think it’s easy for people to understand because, you know, something is created, it needs to be translated, then it needs to be reviewed, and then, at some point – and, invariably, with any project – changes comes up and then they have to go back through that process. And, if it takes, as you say, six months for things to roll through, I mean, that’s, yeah, definitely missed opportunities. You can’t turn on a dime like that. You can’t be as competitive as you want to be like that. So, Cloudwords sounds like it helps in that respect as well, just being more competitive in your marketplace.

HEIDI: Exactly.

To give the perfect example, I mentioned I spent time overseas and one of those roles was as Asia Pacific marketing director for Polycom based out of Singapore. At that point, there are a couple of stories there, we were literally the fastest-growing market for Polycom around the world. But there was, on the product side, not all of the localization priorities were being given to the AMEA market So, even though we were faster growing, there was kind of a mismatch in strategy because all the localization investment was being spent on AMEA and not nearly as much allocated to Asia Pacific. So, as a result, our product wasn’t localized. You know, the user interface wasn’t localized in Japanese which literally was, within Asia Pacific, the largest revenue contributor despite the fact that it wasn’t in Japanese.

However, our competition was eating our lunch in Japan because they did have a localized user interface. And, if we’d only had, at that time, a localized user interface, you know, we would have had that huge share because we were definitely, by that point, the superior offering by far. It was just getting dinged on the localization piece. So, it’s a huge competitive consideration.

CHARLES: Excellent. Well, tell us real quick about the collaboration piece. If you could, just give us an example of one piece that kind of helps people coordinate with each other.

HEIDI: Yeah, sure. So, just the very fact that you’re bringing all marketers into one system to collaborate around the global campaigns – again, let’s use a product launch as an example – there’s a new product, it’s going to all these different markets so having everybody in a system determining what are the elements of the campaign for the launch – you know, the emails, the data sheets, the press release, you know, whatever elements are associated with a campaign – jointly reviewing that in advance and determining, “Hey, yeah, this is relevant to our market.”

So, in some instances, that product may not be going into certain markets or wouldn’t be appropriate so you need to know that. But that upfront collaboration – getting everybody’s input upfront to see – and then everybody can also then track their own individual status of each element in their own language. So, anybody with a vested interest in French, for example, could go in and say, “Oh, okay. It looks like the website translation is on track but, you know, the emails need some attention so let’s address that,” so you can kind of see at a glance.

And then, the CMO or whatever marketing leader can go in and see at a glance, get a dashboard view of the status of the localization of every single element, every single language, every content type of the campaign and make sure that it’s kept on time and that everybody’s in synch. So, it’s that being in synch that has been the Holy Grail for global campaigns and, you know, it’s been very hard to do until Cloudwords.

CHARLES: So, not only communication with your market but also internal communications so that things run smoothly and people understand what’s happening and where we are with the process and things like that.

HEIDI: Absolutely right.

CHARLES: Yeah, a common dashboard, project status. I know that earlier you talked about spreadsheets and disconnected emails and all those types of things. I mean, you can spend a lot of time just going through emails and saying, “No, no, no, that was my previous email,” and then you finally have to have a phone call and then there’s got to be a conference call because everybody has to have the information.

So, yes, having one common place where everybody can just get a snapshot, it’s beautiful. I love that. Excellent.

So, let’s say someone has a project today and they’re kind of, you know, dissatisfied with the process itself, what’s the best way for them to get connected with Cloudwords?

HEIDI: So, you could send an email to sales@Cloudwords.com. Visit Cloudwords.com. Those are the two fastest ways. We will be eager to reach out and, obviously, I’d love to talk to anybody directly, too. I love talking about global marketing – as you can tell, having done a lot of it myself – and I can be reached at heidi@Cloudwords.com.

CHARLES: Excellent. All right. Well, thank you very much. That sounds simple enough.

Thank you, Heidi, for sharing some time with us today and explaining more about how this opportunity works.

HEIDI: Great! Well, thanks again for having me and, as we like to say here, we’re out to help marketers rule the world. There’s a lot of opportunity out there and we really see them as being at the forefront to being able to help their companies seize that opportunity. So, we’d like to help them rule the world.

CHARLES: All right. Well, there you go. You heard Heidi. Visit Cloudwords.com now and be sure to share this video with someone who needs localization for their content and wants to save their time and their energy and their resources because they will be happy and you will be a superhero.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12526/global-content-marketing/feed/ 0 Content Marketing,Global Communications Have you ever used Google Translate to convert website content from one language to another? I have and while Google does an amazing job of attempting translation, I just didn't know enough about the language and cultural differences to know if the tra... Have you ever used Google Translate to convert website content from one language to another? I have and while Google does an amazing job of attempting translation, I just didn't know enough about the language and cultural differences to know if the translation accurate or unintentionally offensive. Now imagine doing that on a much larger scale in multiple languages across multiple cultures. Things would go bad very quickly. Well, today's guest is Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer for Cloudwords, a Marketing Globalization Cloud. It takes all of a business’s marketing material and automatically prepares it for use in any other locality – regardless of language and local customs – and with complete attention to brand guidelines. During our conversation, Heidi explains how to expand your global reach, avoid costly communication mistakes, and increase the productivity of your marketing team using Cloudword's streamlined team communication dashboard. Here's the full transcript: Welcome back to Open Source Marketer. I’m your host, Charles McKeever. Today’s topic is global communications. We’re going to talk about avoiding miscommunication in marketing and how to properly communicate in other geographic regions. Joining me today to talk about this is Heidi Lorenzen, Chief Marketing Officer of CloudWords – the marketing globalization company that takes all of your marketing materials and automatically prepares them for use in other localities. So, Heidi, thank you for joining me today. HEIDI LORENZEN: Thank so much for having me, Charles. CHARLES: You know, this is a really interesting topic to me because I’ve had personal experience with these types of situations where you’re trying to hit a market that’s not necessarily within your sphere of comfort and you’re trying to get all the materials translated and message things correctly and stuff like that. But my two experiences with it have been working with an outside resource – someone who translated something for me and then gave it to me and I didn’t really know what it said but I knew where it was supposed to go – and then, the other one was, you know, I’m a little embarrassed to admit, taking and putting something into Google Translate and then hoping that it was correct and then putting it out there and sharing it with the world. So, let’s talk about CloudWords. What do you guys do and how is that experience different than what I’ve experienced? HEIDI: Yeah. So, CloudWords was created to focus on the needs of folks like yourself – those who are actually in a position of needing to get their content into other markets and wanting to maintain global brand integrity, wanting to do it faster, wanting to do it more efficiently, et cetera. Up until CloudWords was introduced on the scene, the translation industry was dominated by the translation service providers. They were creating efficiencies for the translators. It’s still a very important piece of the process. But nobody was really thinking about the needs of the marketer and, you know, globalization is just a must-do now. You know, it’s not a nice-to-have. You know, the world is flat ten years ago, and even then, if somebody spent a lot of time overseas, I thought that was already old news – that was really old news. So, you know, if a marketer is not thinking consistently about “how am I optimizing growth for my company across the world?” they are leaving money on the table and they’re not really, you know, doing their company the full service that they can be. So, CloudWords aims to kind of address it from that perspective, building in the efficiencies that will allow marketers to do all of the marketing that they want much easier, much more simply, for less effort on their part as well as, you know, less financial resources. CHARLES: Yeah, I know exactly what you’re saying because it doesn’t really matter what space you’re in. I mean, Charles McKeever no 27:16
Using Music To Create Brand Recognition with Colleen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son http://opensourcemarketer.com/12525/using-music-create-brand-recognition/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12525/using-music-create-brand-recognition/#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:04:39 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12525

Sound is part of a universal language that can convey emotion, communicate information, and help us understand how to navigate our daily lives. It can also be a powerful tool for creating brand recognition. Today’s guest is Collen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son, an audio branding agency exclusively dedicated to sound identity, audio branding architecture and in-store sound design. Collen explained that audio branding is not about jingles or licensing popular music. It’s the art of creating a brand¹s distinct audio identity that expresses its personality and values while managing all of the necessary customer touch points. The conversation...

The post Using Music To Create Brand Recognition with Colleen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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Sound is part of a universal language that can convey emotion, communicate information, and help us understand how to navigate our daily lives. It can also be a powerful tool for creating brand recognition. Today’s guest is Collen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son, an audio branding agency exclusively dedicated to sound identity, audio branding architecture and in-store sound design. Collen explained that audio branding is not about jingles or licensing popular music. It’s the art of creating a brand¹s distinct audio identity that expresses its personality and values while managing all of the necessary customer touch points. The conversation expanded my view of using audio for branding and I hope it will inspire you as well.

Here’s a taste of some of the Audio Brands that Sixième Son has created for clients around the world.

Here’s the full transcript:

Welcome back to Open Source Marketer. I’m your host, Charles McKeever.

Today’s topic is audio branding.

Audio branding has become a very popular topic but is it just about jingles and licensing music? Or is it about the art of creating a brand’s distinct audio identity?

Joining us today to discuss the topic is Colleen Fahey, US Managing Director at Sixieme Son.

Sixieme Son is an audio branding agency exclusively dedicated to sound identity, audio branding architecture, and in-store sound design. The company was founded in 1995 and is the pioneer of audio branding. They’re currently Europe’s leading agency in the business.

Colleen, thank you for being here!

COLLEEN FAHEY: Thanks for inviting me! And thanks for inviting me to talk about my very favorite topic.

CHARLES: Yeah, this is fantastic!

COLLEEN: Yeah, I got into audio branding by complete happenstance. I was invited to the first audio branding congress ever held in the United States and it was just at the tail end of 2011 and I looked around this very excited room full of people talking and everybody was wearing very narrowly-cut suits and scarves around their necks and I was like, “They’re very excited. They looked very European. I don’t see any Americans here,” and so I began to realize there was something big going on in Europe that hadn’t quite arrived to the United States.

When I went to the speeches, I was just blown away because the idea had never occurred to me and I’ve been in marketing for over twenty years. I’ve talked about marketing around the world. I give speeches on marketing. I had never thought about the idea that you need to manage your audio with the same care as your visual identity.

CHARLES: Well, I’m glad you say that because I think that we all understand that audio is very powerful. I know we hear it in commercials and TV and film. But, you know, just like you just said, I’m not sure that all of us understand exactly how it all works. So, if you would, just take a moment then to educate us on what is audio branding and how is it commonly used?

COLLEEN: Well, with Sixieme Son, what you do when you create an audio brand is exactly the same as when you’re taking a look at your visual identity. You’re creating a set of tools but they’re auditory. So, instead of your logo typeface colors, you are creating your temple instrumentation – melody, rhythms, harmony – that will be like your audio style guide.

And then, from there, everything that you do comes from it – whether it’s training videos for your people, whether it’s an event in a store, whether it’s a big expo, whether it’s an ad, whether it’s an app or a YouTube video. They all begin to speak the same language. It’s not repetitive like a jingle. It’s not, like, over and over and over and you sing the same thing. You have an audio universe. And then, after a while, people begin to recognize you when they walk by a booth at a conference or they recognize you in many ways.

So, the important thing you have to think about when you’re doing audio branding is, first, what do I stand for? What are my values? What’s my personality? How do I stand apart from my competitors?

Yes? Do you want to add something?

CHARLES: Oh, I was just going to say, is that something that’s custom-created or is that something that you can draw from other existing assets and leverage? How does that work?

COLLEEN: Well, in our world, it’s custom-created. Your brand is unique and you need to describe your brand in a way that is consistent with its meaning, and it would be not impossible to find a song out there that maybe did it, but then it’s somebody else’s song and the song probably gets more benefit than the brand when you do that. No, we really create it from the ground up.

We look at the competitive set. We listen to the music that they use. We look at the heritage – musically and sound-wise – of the brand. Then, we talk a lot about what the brand stands for. So, you might stand for energy and innovation and leadership; you might stand for warmth and hospitality and community support; you might stand for eclecticism and surprise or effervescence. And brands are not super simple so they often are a combination of things.

So, then we go out and we do use music that’s already out in the world to create mood boards. So, you might say, “Okay. Listen to this song. You want to say that you’re a leader. Here’s one way to say you’re a leader.” Maybe it has big bass drums in it. “Oh, my god, no, that’s not the kind of leader we are. We are much more thoughtful and empathetic.” “Okay. Listen to this way being a leader.” Maybe the rhythm is very straight ahead but it’s carried on a bass or something. “Oh, okay. Now that feels more like it – the leader we are.” Then, we have that to say to the creatives, “Okay. This is the kind of musical vocabulary that you might want to consider composing.” You have the same thing in many ways. Do you want people’s voices? Do you want hand claps?

We were doing one with somebody who was trying to say warmth and hospitality, and we had shown them something that was very sweet and whistled and they loved it and they all started smiling, and then they said, “No, no, no, that’s not us. That’s more beach-y and we want people to know we wear shoes.” So, then we killed that one and we went to another one.

So, what we do is work from words into sounds, and then, using both words and sounds, we give the assignment to composers and sound designers, and then they create an audio DNA for the brand. And that audio DNA serves as a style guide – pretty much the way a style guide does for your visual brand guidelines.

CHARLES: So, is that something then that you involve the visual designers?

COLLEEN: Sometimes the visual designers are very involved. In fact, we often are looking at what decisions they made because it helps you really understand the brand. Like, why did you make big blocky letters for your logo? What’s the blue stand for? You know, there’s little dots in here – are those little dots something that’s supposed to be scientific or is it a lot of people coming together? Because it really does help understand the brand. Of course, the client also can help us with that.

CHARLES: Okay.

COLLEEN: In fact, right now we’re working with a visual design firm – exactly right now – and they have a logo that has told us a lot of the story. It’s been very helpful.

CHARLES: It sounds like that makes a lot of sense because it seems like some businesses come into an awareness of what they need to do and then they try to implement different pieces and the message is inconsistent. So, having all that together and integrated sounds like it would definitely be a benefit.

COLLEEN: Yeah, it is, and you should see that when the magic really happens is when the audio is working with the visual logo. So, when the visual logo animates on and it’s supported by the audio, the meaning is just so strong. You can really feel that there’s more. They amplify each other.

So, once you have your audio DNA, then the main piece of it is the audio logo which is a little bit of a motif that runs through the DNA usually, and the audio logo goes with the visual logo as we just talked about. But then, you begin to adapt.

So, if you are having your audio is going to be before an announcement at a train station, you might want to be calming because you don’t want people who are nervous about catching a train or losing their luggage, you want them to feel calm in a calm state of mind, whereas maybe, if it’s at your travel ticket office, you might want to make it anticipatory and lively. But it would still come from the same DNA. Well, that’s how we work.

CHARLES: Okay. That’s interesting.

So far, you’ve kind of mentioned things that are B2C. Does this work for B2B as well?

COLLEEN: For Sixieme Son, about half of our clients are B2B and one of the reasons it’s so good for B2B is because they have less money and they need to manage it very, very carefully. So, if every single touchpoint is being leveraged to create the same brand personality or to help people understand their brand personality and meaning, it is very helpful to the B2B brand. One of our newest clients that we finished working with is an atomic energy company – the world’s largest – Areva. B2B companies now use apps. They use videos on YouTube. They use instructional videos. So, nobody is away from the need to have music that helps define their brand.

CHARLES: Okay. Well, let’s talk about touchpoints then because, you know, there’s internet, of course, there’s TV, television, radio, there’s all these different mediums. So, what should businesses be exploring today and what kind of strategies should they be invoking?

COLLEEN: Well, audio branding is deep. It’s not about any given touchpoint. It’s just that, today, since the 2000s have begun, every new touchpoint is audio-enabled. So, you’re not picking up a newspaper and reading a page quietly. You are on a pad or you might be on a phone – it’s audio-enabled. If you want to click through to a film, there’s a film – that could have music. The app opening could be part of your sound. Everybody uses sales videos – everybody – and that, you know, you shouldn’t just go get cheap music that’s needle drop. You really should have your own brand underscored in those things.

But then, there’s also booths at the convention centers. That’s one of the biggest places that we have had clients asking for it. And then, speeches and conferences that you make, what’s the walk-in music make you feel like? What happens when you rise to the stage? You’re going to make a big product announcement. How are you going to make people feel like emotion behind this product that you’ve put two years of work into? What do you want them to feel as they walk out? All of that can be helped with music and it’s better that it be your music and not just Chariots of Fire, you know, which everybody has already used and maybe makes you jump up out of your seat, but you’d rather have them jump out of their seat for your music.

CHARLES: So, it’s not just about having a sound clip that you can insert here to check a box that you’ve done it. It’s more about creating a user experience overall.

COLLEEN: It’s about creating an experience. That is the idea behind audio branding and almost any branding, right? It’s to bring people into your universe and help them create an experience, and audio has an advantage in that it’s very emotional as well as very communicative.

CHARLES: Online there’s always been this, well, you know, it used to be that there was this sense that, when somebody included audio, you needed a way to turn it off or it wasn’t always necessarily appreciated because you might be at work or things like that. Is audio branding treated differently online than it is offline?

COLLEEN: I mean, online, you probably should be empathetic to the user situation and I don’t think that most people would like a blaring piece of music to come up when a site was open. But you have videos that people click to and watch online, and you do have the ability to offer audio and ask if people want to raise the volume. So, I’m not a big advocate of having a booming sound come out of your site immediately, but there’s many ways that you still use audio on a site – instructional videos, you know, there’s a lot of ways.

CHARLES: I was just about to ask that. With so many different, you know, so much demand for a customer’s attention, how can brands stand out? What’s the one thing right now that’s really getting great results?

COLLEEN: The one thing that’s getting great results is audio breaking through the limited attention span that everybody has. So, when you’re watching television, you’re often not even looking at the television anymore. You’re looking down at a computer. So, if somebody’s visual logo goes by, they’ll never see it. But, if you’re looking down, you can hear the audio because you can close your eyes – you can avert your eyes – but you can’t really close your ears without a lot of work.

I think you might have heard about Linda Stone’s writing about continual partial attention – that everybody’s paying continual partial attention. So, you need every tool you can get to break through this, and one of the ways to do is through using a different sense that people aren’t as aware of and can communicate.

CHARLES: You know, that makes a lot of sense because, even if you’re in a different room – and I know that there’s been times when I want to show somebody something like a commercial or whatever and – I know when that sound comes on, I can identify it from a whole different room and I can say, “Hey! Quick! Come here! Come here! Watch this thing!”

COLLEEN: Yeah, that’s absolutely true. The same thing happens in physical environments. Suddenly, you pick up something you hear that draws your attention and it’s not subliminal but it can just draw your attention without really raising your left brain’s blockades.

CHARLES: All right. Yeah, I know exactly what you’re talking about. There are so many instances where we kind of shut down on certain media. When somebody’s trying to get attention, we’re like, “Oh, no!” especially things like banner ads online and things like that where they’re visual and they want to pop up in your face but you want to block them out because you don’t want to be advertised to.

Now, that’s great. So, give us an example, if you would, of some of the key brands that are using audio branding.

COLLEEN: Well, if you wouldn’t mind, I have a little presentation that shows some of our clients and some of our thoughts and I could do it that way by using some examples.

CHARLES: That’d be great.

COLLEEN: Is that okay?

CHARLES: All right.

COLLEEN: Okay. Let’s do that.

So, some of the brands, probably the oldest and best known audio brand in the United States was actually created by an Austrian and it’s the Intel.

CHARLES: All right.

COLLEEN: Yeah.

CHARLES: Go ahead and, if you would, expand the presentation there. We’re not really seeing it.

COLLEEN: Okay. There you go.

CHARLES: There we go. That looks great.

COLLEEN: Okay. So, I invite you to hear the brand. Unfortunately, I am not going to play the music because it’s sounding a little tinny over the box, over the connection, but I would like to just say that audio branding is not about creating jingles or licensing music tracks – though that can be a small part of it. It’s about finding your voice – about finding your audio DNA – and, these days, you have so many touchpoints – so many and all are audio-enabled.

So, you have YouTube videos and on-hold music which is a very important part of our business and a very wonderful way to talk to customers while they’re waiting. You have product sounds. You have opportunities to make sounds at retail. You have ringtones, sampling, apps. But often, these days, instead of having your two or three agencies that you used to have, you have, like, nine, ten, twelve agencies if you’re a client, and there’s very few clients in the United States who are managing their audio universe. So, somebody’s licensing Vivaldi for your on-hold music, and someone else is using hard rock in some kind of an employee video, and someone else is using – I don’t know – independent music.

Sorry. Let me go back. You have eight, nine, ten agencies and they’re all licensing different music – needle drop, 80s, things that they used to like, things their girlfriends like – and you don’t end up having a brand. But, if you have an audio brand, you can manage them with an audio DNA and you can have them all relate to each other.

So, I like to use this slide just to sort of show that there’s a central repository of sound. But then, you can compose different music for different things. For instance, your video news releases that your PR agency is putting out. Often, they’re not thinking about branded music at all. They’re just picking up music from, you know, a site that sells or rents music. So, you want to manage your audio universe.

Here’s four ideas that I like to talk about.

One is that music is a language that’s universally understood. Just as colors, shapes, typefaces convey meaning, so do rhythms, harmonies, melodies, instrumentation, texture, and it transcends language. If you have a global brand, it’s really important to think about using music. It also transcends socio-economics. It also works for people who are illiterate. So, if you have a brand whose population is either a child or is somebody who doesn’t read easily, you should consider using your music to be a language for you.

Another one is that music has been proven to move behavior. There is a lovely in-store study that was done in Scotland that had French wine and German wine side-by-side, same prices, and one day they’d play German music and one day they’d play French music and then they’d play German then they’d play French. And each time that the music changed, German wines would go up on the days that German music was playing and French wine sales would be higher on the days that the French music was playing. People were almost completely unaware. There were 85 percent of the people in exit interviews had been unaware that there was music playing at all. So, in this case, I would say the country is the brand and the influence of music was because of the country’s music.

CHARLES: That’s incredible.

COLLEEN: Yeah, really. It’s one of my favorite studies. There aren’t too many studies about this, but I search them out and there’s a new one that has just come out that says that the visual cortex processes sound and that made me think of another piece of research that I heard that said that if you looked at pictures and you heard a coherent sound like, let’s say you looked at pictures of ducks, horses, cows, pigs, if you heard “moo,” you’d see the cow faster. And then, another study came out recently that said that sound helps you see something faster because the visual cortex actually processes sound as well as other parts of the brain.

So, if you hear a motorcycle coming toward you, you’re primed to see a motorcycle. If you hear a motorcycle coming toward you and you look up and what you see is a horse, you’re not primed for it.

CHARLES: I could see that because it seems like, you know, I always think of our brain as a computer and, as we’re trying to sift through like a search engine and trying to figure out what we’re looking at, if we have another piece of information to go along with that, we can kind of jump to exactly where we need to be. So, you know, that’s not a person – that’s an animal. It’s not a dog, it’s a cow. You know, that kind of thing.

COLLEEN: Yeah. But who’d have thought that the visual cortex knows how to hear, you know? That was the part that sort of blew my mind but felt right at the same time. But you can also see how that might relate to audio branding.

If it helps you see something faster, then you have an advantage on a shelf or in a website among other products. So, that’s why I think it’s interesting to consider. You know, this is all early. There’s not a lot of studies done on audio branding yet but there are enough to give plenty of indications that it works very well.

So, this is my final conclusion. If you have a visual brand, you should also have an audio brand because every new touchpoint is audio-enabled, but many US marketers are pretending we’re still turning pages and not dealing with audio with the same care as they are with visual.

So, that’s the box of clients.

I’m sorry. Did I interrupt you?

CHARLES: No, I’m sorry. Go ahead.

COLLEEN: So, there are some of Sixieme Son’s clients. We do Michelin and Samsung and AXA and just have been working with the City of Atlanta on their audio brand. In fact, some of the examples I used about the mood boards were about Atlanta. We’re working on our product introduction with AstraZeneca. We have done the music for Royal Air Maroc which is beautiful. It was sort of an unbranded, any-day airline and now it seems so luxurious and so majestic and it really was helped by its audio brand.

I’m so sad I can’t play the music, but I know you said that you would put this up.

CHARLES: Yeah, we’ll definitely embed it in the blog post because you previewed it for me and, of course, I’m okay with viewing it through this medium, but we definitely want to present it in the best light possible so, yeah, I’ll definitely put it up on the website, that way people can listen to it in all of its beauty.

COLLEEN: Okay. So, then I will just tell you that the Michelin brand embodies the values of innovation, modernity, distinctiveness, mobility, and pleasure. And I can’t play it for you but you’ll hear it later. This was a corporate global event film and you can see when you listen to it that the music is going to be the same world but not exactly the same tune until the end.

In Michelin’s case, we have results because there was music in these wonderful commercials and then it was replaced by audio branded music that was scored to the commercials. What happened was the commercials in the US and around the world were better understood, and then the company was seen as more innovative, more friendly, more drivable, and more leader-like because we’d built that into the audio brand and it became an important part of the brand overall.

So, we do the corporate videos, we do instructional videos, we do on-hold music for these people.

We’ve just finished, one year ago, Peugeot. Their goal was to move up-market and infuse emotion into their brand. They were particularly interested in being these impeccable standards, pleasure of driving, the stylish, elegant, and they’re going into a lot of new markets so it was important to them to start moving up the scale of being a more high-end brand and seen as a luxury brand.

So, you can see that we created a lot of different kinds of music for them and we’ve just gotten test results. We have seen in these test results that Peugeot is leading some competitors that we tested against in agreeable to hear, captivating, modern, upscale, emotional. And the competitors were leading in ordinary, boring, irritating, and unusual. And we’re tied in original.

In the markets that were newer, where the brand doesn’t have a standing yet, we even got higher scores on high standards and good technology, partly because it’s a green field. It’s a clean slate, you know?

So, this is what the test results said that the audio identity said about the brand. It said it was stylish, it said it was modern, it had personality, it had emotion, and it had strength. You can see that this is China, Brazil, UK, France, and Spain. So, that underscores the idea of being a universal language.

CHARLES: Yeah, it transcends all cultures and language barriers and things like that.

COLLEEN: Latin American, Asian. So, that’s one of the things, that music transcends borders so easily. You know, Psy’s two billion hits. It’s so easy to send music around the world and movies have helped create a language that people tend to understand everywhere.

Okay. This is a playful, light, simple brand. I think I’m just going to hop through since I’m not going to play music for you. It doesn’t seem fair. You can just see that those are some of the brands. MACSF, by the way, is an insurance company for health care professionals, very B2B.

So, you can start, sometimes people start because they have a big event coming up. Sometimes they start because they want to create a global music library for people all around the world to pick music that all relates to the brand and then they only have to license it once and everybody gets it and can work with it. Sometimes it’s a TV campaign that starts. Sometimes it’s a big sales push. So, those are ways to use audio branding.

Just a quick thing on Sixieme Son. It’s almost having its twentieth birthday and it only is dedicated to audio identity. That’s all we do. We don’t do anything for musicians or movies or TV shows. We are a branding agency, first and foremost, but the only tool we work with is sound. And so, that requires that we have a consulting and strategic group. We have creators who are composers and sound designers. And then, we have people who are marketers and project managers.

CHARLES: That’s fantastic. So, then when I come to you to create a brand using audio, then there’s a team to take me through the process, is that what I hear?

COLLEEN: Oh, yes. There is a process – that’s one thing – and there’s a team that really knows its part in the process. It’s a very strong team, works very well together, and will certainly never give you fewer than three different options to choose from that emphasize maybe different parts even though they’ll all come from the same main values, but maybe you’ll want to hear, “I want to hear a warmer tone. I want to hear a more futuristic tone,” you know.

So, you’ll always have more than one composer working on it. And it’s basically the basic branding process where you’re analyzing your competitors, your own heritage, your aspirations, then creating mood boards, then creating the creative DNA, and then doing the adaptations and implementing them. And you get an audio style guide which is an important thing for your life.

If you don’t have an audio style guide, you should be thinking about that because that’s one of the ways to keep your brand coherent.

So, here’s just an example of what an adaptation might be. It would be a meetings and events sound package where you’d get your background music so, as people come in or your awkward conversation and things and you’re trying to set them up and get them ready for what they’re going to hear and then opening music which is usually sort of levitating, and closing music that helps bring them back to the things that excited them during the presentations, and then a few other things. So, that’s a typical adaptation of an audio brand that you might ask for and get.

CHARLES: So, just to go back to that for just a moment. Do I understand that then that you have maybe the audio piece as a whole, but then you’re saying maybe you can break that up into separate pieces and still keep the continuity?

COLLEEN: You compose different pieces coming off of your audio brand and then you always have it.

CHARLES: Okay.

COLLEEN: So, the background music when people are coming in is not so lively and dynamic.

CHARLES: Right.

COLLEEN: It puts them in a happy place but it’s not shocking them into it. Maybe playing a little bit of the motif through so their ears are prepared for the big opening or the CEO is about to walk up to the stage and announce something.

CHARLES: But the main point being that it plays off of the original concept or original audio DNA so you’re not creating a whole separate thing.

COLLEEN: Audio DNA.

CHARLES: Yeah. Okay.

COLLEEN: So, you’re always interpreting the audio DNA into the brand. If you want to get people really revved up and really excited, you’ll do a version of your audio DNA that’s not completely different but it’s got a lot of energy. And then, you can also do a very calm version. Maybe you want to talk about patience and the problems that they’re having and why your drug is going to help them, then you’re going to do it in a much more sort of easy-going and quiet way. So, once you have your DNA, it begins to be interpretable and, pretty soon, you have a library of music that you can use for many occasions.

CHARLES: Makes sense. Okay

COLLEEN: Okay.

And then, I just want to say, who needs audio branding most? Well, pretty much anybody who has a brand. But highly competitive categories, I think it’s a tool that you want to have in your toolkit and you might get there before other people. If you’re a global brand, you may be competing with people who already have audio brands, but we talked about the fact that it transcends literacy, socio-economics, and it’s a true language that people understand. An emotional product, you can really heighten the correct emotions and infuse meaning. When there’s multiple touchpoints, you can use an audio brand to tie them together. And, if you’re doing a brand refresh, it is a great way to add a layer of meaning and get people to understand what you’re saying about your brand faster.

So, that’s all I have to say today about this unless you have more questions.

CHARLES: No.

COLLEEN: So, I’ll leave you with my question which is, “Can people identify your brand with their eyes closed?”

CHARLES: Very nice. Yeah, close your eyes.

Well, thank you very much, Colleen. I appreciate it.

COLLEEN: Okay!

CHARLES: We’ve got a little bit of feedback going on but that’s great information.

Where should someone go if they want to get started?

COLLEEN: They could go to SixiemeSon.com but they could also just call or write me, Colleen Fahey, 312.451.7150 or c.fahey@ sixiemeson.com and I’ll spell that – S-I-X-I-E-M-E-S-O-N.com.

CHARLES: Excellent, and we’ll put a link in the show notes as well.

COLLEEN: That would be very helpful because your name is easier to spell than mine.

CHARLES: Well, thank you very much, Colleen.

The post Using Music To Create Brand Recognition with Colleen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12525/using-music-create-brand-recognition/feed/ 0 Sound is part of a universal language that can convey emotion, communicate information, and help us understand how to navigate our daily lives. It can also be a powerful tool for creating brand recognition. Today's guest is Collen Fahey, U.S. Sound is part of a universal language that can convey emotion, communicate information, and help us understand how to navigate our daily lives. It can also be a powerful tool for creating brand recognition. Today's guest is Collen Fahey, U.S. Managing Director Sixieme Son, an audio branding agency exclusively dedicated to sound identity, audio branding architecture and in-store sound design. Collen explained that audio branding is not about jingles or licensing popular music. It’s the art of creating a brand¹s distinct audio identity that expresses its personality and values while managing all of the necessary customer touch points. The conversation expanded my view of using audio for branding and I hope it will inspire you as well. Here's a taste of some of the Audio Brands that Sixième Son has created for clients around the world. Here's the full transcript: Welcome back to Open Source Marketer. I’m your host, Charles McKeever. Today’s topic is audio branding. Audio branding has become a very popular topic but is it just about jingles and licensing music? Or is it about the art of creating a brand’s distinct audio identity? Joining us today to discuss the topic is Colleen Fahey, US Managing Director at Sixieme Son. Sixieme Son is an audio branding agency exclusively dedicated to sound identity, audio branding architecture, and in-store sound design. The company was founded in 1995 and is the pioneer of audio branding. They’re currently Europe’s leading agency in the business. Colleen, thank you for being here! COLLEEN FAHEY: Thanks for inviting me! And thanks for inviting me to talk about my very favorite topic. CHARLES: Yeah, this is fantastic! COLLEEN: Yeah, I got into audio branding by complete happenstance. I was invited to the first audio branding congress ever held in the United States and it was just at the tail end of 2011 and I looked around this very excited room full of people talking and everybody was wearing very narrowly-cut suits and scarves around their necks and I was like, “They’re very excited. They looked very European. I don’t see any Americans here,” and so I began to realize there was something big going on in Europe that hadn’t quite arrived to the United States. When I went to the speeches, I was just blown away because the idea had never occurred to me and I’ve been in marketing for over twenty years. I’ve talked about marketing around the world. I give speeches on marketing. I had never thought about the idea that you need to manage your audio with the same care as your visual identity. CHARLES: Well, I’m glad you say that because I think that we all understand that audio is very powerful. I know we hear it in commercials and TV and film. But, you know, just like you just said, I’m not sure that all of us understand exactly how it all works. So, if you would, just take a moment then to educate us on what is audio branding and how is it commonly used? COLLEEN: Well, with Sixieme Son, what you do when you create an audio brand is exactly the same as when you’re taking a look at your visual identity. You’re creating a set of tools but they’re auditory. So, instead of your logo typeface colors, you are creating your temple instrumentation – melody, rhythms, harmony – that will be like your audio style guide. And then, from there, everything that you do comes from it – whether it’s training videos for your people, whether it’s an event in a store, whether it’s a big expo, whether it’s an ad, whether it’s an app or a YouTube video. They all begin to speak the same language. It’s not repetitive like a jingle. It’s not, like, over and over and over and you sing the same thing. You have an audio universe. And then, after a while, people begin to recognize you when they walk by a booth at a conference or they recognize you in many ways. So, the important thing you have to think about when you’re doing audio branding is, first, Charles McKeever no 35:24
7 Deadly Sins of Content Marketing Automation with UberFlip CEO, Yoav Schwartz http://opensourcemarketer.com/12508/seven-deadly-sins-of-content-marketing-automation/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12508/seven-deadly-sins-of-content-marketing-automation/#comments Wed, 09 Jul 2014 02:26:46 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12508

Today’s Open Source Marketer podcast guest is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip. UberFlip makes content marketing and marketing automation push button easy for marketers who want to aggregate content into valuable hubs without involving designers or a development team. Everything in UberFlip is drag-and-drop and you can even add external services like Google Analytics, Mailchimp, HubSpot, and Marketo. There’s a clear focus on lead generation using relevant content and they even provide the ability to make some or all of your content gated so visitors have to give up their email before interacting with content. During our conversation, Yoav...

The post 7 Deadly Sins of Content Marketing Automation with UberFlip CEO, Yoav Schwartz appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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Today’s Open Source Marketer podcast guest is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip.

UberFlip makes content marketing and marketing automation push button easy for marketers who want to aggregate content into valuable hubs without involving designers or a development team. Everything in UberFlip is drag-and-drop and you can even add external services like Google Analytics, Mailchimp, HubSpot, and Marketo. There’s a clear focus on lead generation using relevant content and they even provide the ability to make some or all of your content gated so visitors have to give up their email before interacting with content.

During our conversation, Yoav covered the 7 deadly sins of marketing automation and how marketers can avoid making the mistakes that keep them from reaching their goals. A full transcript of the conversation is provided below.

If you’re interested in creating a content hub that focuses on lead generation, sign up for a 14 day free trial of UberFlip. There’s no coding required and it’s insanely simple to manage.

Have questions?

Let’s continue the conversation on Facebook.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

Full Transcript:

CHARLES MCKEEVER: All right! Welcome back to Open Source Marketer!

I’m your host, Charles McKeever, and today’s topic centers around content marketing and the seven deadly sins of marketing automation.

Joining us today is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip.

Yoav, thanks for joining us today!

YOAV SCHWARTZ: Happy to be here!

CHARLES: Awesome. Now, before we jump into the seven deadly sins, let’s back up just a few steps and define for the audience what is content marketing and what is marketing automation?

YOAV: Sure. So, interesting place to start; the way we define UberFlip really is content marketing automation so a combination of those two topics.

Content marketing is really leveraging content and really borrowing thoughtful pieces that are meant to passively find visitors or your audience, engage them – whether it’s helpful content, snacky content, whatever it might be – with the purpose of passively selling them what you’re selling.

Rather than very aggressively giving a sales pitch, provide content that is useful. Create yourself as a source of great resources around a certain topic that resonates with your audience so that they keep you top of mind when they are ready to make a purchasing decision.

Marketing automation is really built on a foundation of email. If you think about tools like Marketo or Hubspot or Eloqua, the real automation comes in the ability of how to send different people down different tracks in order to email them or send them offers, depending on what stage they are in in the buying process.

So, taking somebody from an unknown person such as a visitor on your website and nurturing them all the way to becoming a customer. Along that path, you want to send them different messages, you want to put them down different tracks, different lists within your marketing automation tool so that you can send them relevant information to nurture them and get them through that path to customer and beyond.

CHARLES: Okay. Then you’re definitely a fan of marketing automation then?

YOAV: Yeah, we’re big fans. I mean, we use marketing automation for Hubspot customers.

There’s definitely a need for both content and marketing automation in any marketing strategy.

CHARLES: Okay. Well, I want to talk more about that when we get to the portion about automation and our seven deadly sins because, you know, I’m sure there are some caveats to that as well.

All right. So, let’s talk then about UberFliip for just a minute. Let’s define exactly what UberFlip does and how it approaches marketing.

YOAV: Sure.

What we do at UberFlip is, again, we’re content marketing automation; we automate a lot of the complexities around an effective content strategy. What’s happening today in the marketplace, those that have already recognized the need for content marketing, they’re spending a lot of their energy and dollars on content creation which is a very important aspect to content marketing.

We really define content marketing as being four separate pillars. There’s the content creation; the distribution, getting it out there; then, there’s the engagement or the interface in which people actually interact with your content; and, finally, it’s the insight, the metrics, how well is your content performing.

Nowadays, most people who have adopted content marketing are really spending all their time and energy on just that first half which is the content creation and distribution – very important. But, ultimately, you’re spending all that money; you want to know what it’s doing for your business so that’s really where UberFlip comes in.

We take all that content; we create a great user experience out of it, but not just to have a great pretty experience but with the actual purpose of generating leads out of your visitors through connections to marketing automations. We handle very strongly that other half of content marketing which is great experience with conversion tools built in and with metrics so you understand the ROI of your content.

CHARLES: It’s interesting that you say that because that mirrors the experience I’ve had with clients. There’s a lot of time and energy spent. On one hand, I’ve spent time convincing them that they need to create content; then, convincing them that they need to share it. Once you get them into that rhythm of things, it seems natural to ask, “Okay, how effective is that content?” You also have all these different channels that you have to manage.

One of the things that I noticed when I set up my UberFlip account was that it aggregates and pulls everything together. Is that on purpose? I mean, what’s the strategy there for managing different channels?

YOAV: Yeah, absolutely.

You know, in today’s world, you’re pushing content out everywhere. If you’re creating a video, you’re probably putting it on YouTube, and why not? You want to track the visitors that exist on YouTube. Your social content goes out to several different streams – you’ve got Twitter, Facebook. You know, you’re putting out your photos on Instagram. You’re putting out your blog. You know, you’re putting your slide presentations on SlideShare. You have a bunch of PDFs that are probably sitting around doing nothing for you. We bring all of that in. So, the very first thing you do with UberFlip is connect all your different sources of content.

We bring it in for two reasons. Number one, we want to give your content a home. The last thing you want to do is direct people away from your website once you’ve finally got them to come in the door. Think about how much money you spend bringing people in and how often you see on a website, you know, “Follow us on Twitter” or “Check out our YouTube channel” and you push them right back out. That makes no sense. Beyond just losing that visitor, you have no way of understanding the conversion or how engaged they are with the content outside of your sphere.

What we do is we allow you to bring all that content in for the purpose of being able to send people to view your tweets, to view your Instagram photos, your SlideShare presentations, your YouTube videos, your PDFs that we convert to flipbooks, all in one central home that’s all about your brand so that, when they finish watching that video, although it’s hosted on YouTube, the next video they watch is, you know, guaranteed to be, a piece of content that is part of your brand experience rather than whatever other video they might land on in YouTube.

CHARLES: I also like that there was a focus – like you said before – on leads, on converting that content into some sort of tangible result at the end. That, to me, was very attractive.

So, talk a little bit about UberFlip and how it allows you to be able to do that.

YOAV: Sure. That’s really where the magic kicks in.

Beyond having a great user experience, we’re not all about engagement and how many user shares you got. At the end of the day, our customers have business objectives. They’re trying to convert those visitors into leads and we offer a lot of tools to not only do that but also measure the success.

First of all, we allow you to connect any of your marketing tools like the easy stuff like Google Analytics, but also your marketing automation like Marketo or Hubspot or Eloqua. What that does is allows you to create call-to-action tiles as we call them or web-to-lead forms that are directly integrated with your marketing tools and allow you, as a marketer, to basically insert these web-to-lead forms anywhere you want within your content – passively, beside a listing of your content, or actually while someone’s reading your blog article or watching your video. You can have that web-to-lead form beside your content or even use it as a gate to gate people from accessing that premium content within your UberFlip experience.

We’ve really built everything with the marketers in mind, that this should not require any technical knowledge. It’s all about being able to empower marketers to be the owners of this experience so that they don’t have to loop in the development team, they don’t have to loop in designers; they can basically manage this entire experience on their own and generate leads and modify and A/B test everything all on their own which means that you can very effectively make changes on the fly without having to involve anybody else.

And we give you the tools to understand exactly what piece of content is converting. So, if you have a video that has brought you, you know, a thousand people have viewed it and 57 clicked through on your web-to-lead form on that video, then it’s got a conversion rate that you can attribute to “All right. This video is actually bringing me leads.” Another piece of content may not bring you any leads, but we’ll show you that, after viewing or reading that article, people are more likely to convert on the next piece of content that they consume.

We’re kind of giving you that deep insight as to how your visitors are sloughing through your content and where you have the most success, what you should keep doing, and what you should stop doing because it’s not working.

CHARLES: Right. Yeah, I’m glad you mentioned the technical aspects of things because I am technical – I’m a geek – and I’ve kind of back-ended to marketing as a natural progression of the conversation. So, whenever I look at something like a tool, I always evaluate it from the standpoint of “Could I do this on my own? Could I create this myself?” and so, the natural question becomes, “Well, couldn’t you just put up a WordPress blog and aggregate all this stuff together yourself?” But, as you mentioned, there’s that aspect of not having to do any of the coding yourself and even though you might have the coding muscle to pull all this stuff together, it seems like there’s so much time-saving in just being able to drag-and-drop and be able to get right to it without having to prove your coding muscles.

YOAV: Yeah, absolutely, and you touched on a good point – that most marketers think they’re doing content marketing because they have a WordPress blog and they’ve added a bunch of widgets to it. That’s a great start, but you quickly find that, with a tool like WordPress, that blog articles are just one type of content. What often happens is, when you have that video, you’re forced to create an article and plop that video in to have the same effect as your blog articles do and it’s not scalable and it also doesn’t provide you that insight that you want at each individual content level.

With UberFlip, you connect your YouTube playlist – I mean, it doesn’t even have to be your videos; you could aggregate and curate videos from around YouTube. Each one of those basically becomes the equivalent of a blog post that you can edit. You can bring it to life. It has its own unique URL. You can turn it into a gated piece of content. We’re just giving marketers a ton of flexibility around content without specifically saying, “Only focus on your blog articles.” It’s about getting all of your content in there and giving it all the same opportunities.

CHARLES: Yeah, exactly. I like to find tools that take whatever it is that I think I can do myself and just turn that into something that’s just effortless.

All right. Well, let’s move on here.

Now that we’ve defined content marketing and marketing automation and got a little sample of what UberFlip’s about, let’s move onto the seven deadly sins. Let’s discuss those. I’ve got those here as bullet points and we’ll go through all of them.

Basically, they’re strategy, email, team, nurturing, quantity, metrics, and autopilots.

Let’s start with strategy. What is a deadly sin of marketing automation related to strategy?

YOAV: Sure.

You know, strategy is everything. It’s not just marketing automation; you always have to have a strategy.

One of the things that people rely on in marketing automation is that it’s just going to do all the hard work for you. But the reality is that it needs to automate your strategy. If your strategy is to send people down a specific path whether they are visitors or they’re already customers and you want to nurture them, the first thing you want to do is define your personas.

You want to know who you’re talking to and that’s marketing in general. It’s especially important when you’re doing content marketing, but the same thing holds true for marketing automation. You want to define you minimum three personas or the type of buyers that you have and define them each separately. Send people down a dedicated path for how you think they’re most likely going to convert whether it’s when they’re first visitors, when they get your first drip campaign.

How you get them through that process requires you to strategize and actually continuously improve that strategy, and going in blindly and saying, “You know what? We’re going to treat everybody the same. We just want to get people on to our lists and start marketing towards them.” I mean, that’s a recipe for failure.

CHARLES: Yeah, I’ve heard it said that, if you’re marketing to everybody, you’re marketing to nobody.

YOAV: That’s a great way of putting it.

CHARLES: Now, you mentioned earlier A/B testing. I think what I hear is that I could come up with an initial strategy and then A/B test my way into an actual sales funnel that works. Is that correct?

YOAV: Yeah. A/B testing goes right across the board. Whether you’re testing your emails, you’re testing your call-to-actions, you’re testing the headlines on your blog articles or your videos, you need to test everything. Very hard to do everything. You know, you have to pick specifically the areas where you think you can get the biggest list. But, yes, A/B testing is critical because you can make assumptions, but your assumptions are only good as the data that you have to actually figure out whether or not they’re true.

CHARLES: Okay. So, have a strategy and then work that strategy and adjust it as you go.

YOAV: Yeah.

CHARLES: Email, let’s talk about that.

It’s kind of always a point of contention for people. Some people say email’s dead, some people say it’s the most effective way to reach people. What is the deadly sin of email?

YOAV: Email is not dead. Email is not going anywhere.

The reality is email is still an effective channel. If you think about why marketing automation tools came to be in the first place – and some of the giants in the industry like Eloqua – the reason they even define why they even started their businesses is because people weren’t picking up the phone anymore. They recognized that email is the best place – the next best place – to reach these people and they automated a lot of deciding when to send emails, who to send them, and why.

Email is a great mechanism, but people are starting to ignore emails, too. We’re in an age now where, if you want to reach somebody, content is proven to be the most effective way. So, it’s not that you should only do content. It’s not that you should only do email. It’s that you should recognize that your audience is in many different places, that you need an effective strategy across the board.

If  you truly rely on email, you’re missing a huge opportunity with content.

CHARLES: Okay, excellent. And then, along with that, living on an island or not living on an island, who should you involve in your team?

YOAV: As many of them as possible. You know, even here at UberFlip, none of the decisions that we make – even at product level, because we’re a marketing tool, it would be expected, we include our marketing team – you want to gain everybody’s insight.

Every organization is going to have some form of a marketing team, a sales team, a customer support team, and a customer success team. Those four different departments all have very different functions and gain very different insights into what your customers are looking for.

Your marketing is obviously the first point of contact. It’s the, you know, what kind of message do we want to put out there? Your sales people are typically talking to prospective clients. You know, what kind of pain points do they have that your solution or your service might be able to satisfy? Your support people are talking to customers who are having problems so you want to know what those problems are. And your success team is the ones responsible for speaking to your existing customers – they may not be happy, they may be happy. You’re trying to fill a gap to try to satisfy their needs with maybe certain parts of your service or product that haven’t been discovered by them yet.

So, all these different groups have very different insights, but all of those need to come together so that you know how to speak to your visitors, your customers, your new customers, your old customers – it doesn’t matter. You want to gain as much insight as possible and it’s right there at your fingertips so you need to include all those members of your groups.

CHARLES: It sounds like that almost goes back to the strategy aspects of things where you’re coming up with an initial strategy but then, maybe over time, the word on the street or the feedback that you’re getting may change that strategy and send you in a new direction based on what you hear. Is that what a team does for you?

YOAV: Absolutely. I mean, marketing comes down to messaging. There’s two ways to know if your messaging is working – you can measure specifically how people are converting on that message, but you can also start to understand what type of customers you’re actually attracting. If that doesn’t align with your messaging, you might have a bigger opportunity by adjusting that messaging to speak to that more ideal customer.

CHARLES: Yeah, that’s interesting that you say that because it is possible, I think, to attract the wrong customer.

YOAV: We’ve been there.

CHARLES: So, let’s talk about nurturing versus selling.

You mentioned just a moment ago that the messaging is very important. What’s the deadly sin when it comes to pitching your information?

YOAV: Sure.

For content marketing, the whole concept is soft selling. If you’re too aggressive in your pitch, or you’re writing content that reeks of a sales pitch, it’s the last time you’re going to see this person. They’re not coming back.

The effect that you want to create with both your content and your marketing automation is that you are here to help. Who you’re here to help all comes back to that strategy. You’ve got to define your personas, you’ve got to identify those people that are potential customers, and you’re got to speak to their pain points. What are they trying to learn? What type of content is going to interest them? And it doesn’t always have to relate to exactly what your product or service does. Sometimes, it’s much broader than that – speaking to the general interest of that type of person is going to have.

But you want to establish yourself as a trusted source. By doing so, you can gently – and, not in every piece of content – but you can gently start to suggest, “Oh, by the way, if you enjoyed reading this, this is something that we happen to do or something that we happen to solve,” and sending people through suggestive ways to buy your product will effectively bring you more long-term customers. You’ve already gained their trust and that’s a big difference. By hard selling, and if you look back at how things used to be, you know, the hard sell, you may have brought on customers, but then it was a huge responsibility to prove your worth to really make them a sticky customer.

Today, content is allowing us to kind of do a lot of that upfront. We gain trust by being helpful and only naturally do people want to see what else you do. You know, “If you’re providing me great content, you’re providing me great insights, I enjoy your emails, I enjoy your videos, whatever it might be; what else do you do?” Maybe there’s interest there and that’s how you’re going to build a much stronger customer base.

CHARLES: Okay. That also speaks to long-term sales versus the one-time sale, too. Correct?

YOAV: Absolutely.

CHARLES: Okay.

The next deadly sin here is quantity. What are we talking about there?

YOAV: You know, it’s a tricky balance. You don’t want to create too much content because you want to create quality content. But, at the same time, you do need content.

An effective content marketing strategy is going to take you six months to see any sort of ROI if you’re just getting started and that’s a factor of proving that you have great content. So, Google and other search engines are, first of all, indexing your content. You have to have enough in the bucket for you to actually gain visitors or to rank higher for certain search terms.

At the other end of the spectrum, your marketing automation tool is only going to be effective if you have something to automate. If you’re not giving it anything, you’re not giving it enough insights into how your audience is consuming content, then it’s not going to be able to do its job.

So, not having enough content basically creates a bottleneck. That’s actually what’s happening today a lot in the industry. People are investing in marketing automation but haven’t invested enough in content and they’re blaming marketing automation for not doing its job, but the reality is that they haven’t fed it.

CHARLES: Let me ask you. Some people say that you should put something out every day. Some people say that you should just be on a consistent schedule – like, maybe every Tuesday, Thursday, you do something.

What do you think is a good rhythm when it comes to the quantity of content?

YOAV: That’s a good question. I think it totally depends on your audience. Again, it comes down to persona.

If you’re creating content that’s extremely technical, you’re not going to be able to produce something every day. On the other hand, if you’re creating more snacky content or content that’s supposed to be fun and shareable, then why not? Yeah, produce something every day. You want your stuff to go viral and, you know, being in front of your audience more often is going to help you. So, it really depends.

General rule of thumb is we produce at least one piece of content a day, but that’s just fresh content whether it’s an article or a whitepaper or a slide deck or video. We’re also, of course, sharing on social media, we’re posting pictures to Instagram, and that happens multiple times a day. So, it’s really the type of content and your audience that’ll depend how frequently you should be posting.

CHARLES: Okay, great. Yeah, it seems like in today’s world, you never know where somebody’s paying attention. Like you say, it almost makes sense just to be everywhere since you can and put something out so, at least, you have a pretty good chance of somebody seeing you.

Now, along with that, like we’ve just said, we’ve got putting out content on a regular basis. What kind of metrics should someone be keeping?

YOAV: Sure.

You know, traditionally, people have been looking at what we call “vanity metrics.” How many views did I get? How many shares did this piece of content get? Those are great to kind of give you a very bland sense of how effective your content is, but the reality is shares are proving to have zero value in terms of actually understanding people’s engagement in your content. It’s really about engagement.

You’re seeing some players out there doing some fancy stuff like engaged time on a piece of content by tracking things like the mouse movement and stuff like that. That’s great. But, in our world, the most effective way of knowing where a piece of content is effective is to actually measure if people are converting on it and a conversion will depend on what your business objectives are.

For us, it’s that you’re signing up to either receive a piece of content or you’re signing up to receive emails, it’s that new content in our hub – that, to us, is the definitive way of measuring the success of your content. Is it returning ROI? And most businesses can put a value on a lead – a dollar value. They know exactly how much it typically costs to bring in a lead.

So, if we tell you that this video brought you 12 leads and this article brought you 37 leads, then you can put a dollar value and you can look back and say, “Well, I spent $100 on this blog post and it’s produced $1,200 worth of leads. That was a great blog post. I should keep doing what I did there and it might be that I should keep writing blog posts or it might be that the topic really resonated with my audience. Maybe now I create a video around that topic.”

Insights are what’s going to tell you what to do next. So, you want to measure stuff. You want to measure the vanity stuff like views and shares, but you really want to find a way to measure the success of your content and that’s typically the conversion rate on that piece of content.

CHARLES: Okay, excellent. Now, before we started the list here, we talked about automation or autopilot. What kind of sins are there around putting things on autopilot?

YOAV: Sure.

You know, this really comes back to that you’ve got to test; you’ve got to continue to improve. If you decide, even if you have a good strategy to begin with, but you decide, “I’m going to send people down this path. I’ve defined my personas. I know exactly what’s going to get them to convert. I’m going to send them down this email path. I’m going to send them this piece of content. It’s just going to magically work and I’m going to go on a six-month sabbatical. My business is on autopilot.” That’s going to fail.

The reality is you have to keep modifying. You have to keep testing. The automation is really just, “How do I get less people involved?” That’s the way you need to look at automation.

You know, we used to do all these things manually by moving people off different lists. We used to define different paths. Now, we can automate a lot of that based on user interactions. Like, they viewed this article so I want to send them down this path. That’s all great, but it’s going to work for a finite amount of time, and most likely, it can be refined and it can be improved.

Use marketing automation for its strength by minimizing the amount of resources you need to get things done, but don’t assume that’s just going to magically do things for you. It’s just going to do what you tell it to do so you need to keep feeding it more and more information and keep optimizing your strategy if you want to remain effective and just keep better.

CHARLES: Okay. So, using UberFlip as an example, what would be a good example of an autopilot or an automation piece that we would want to implement into a site?

YOAV: Sure. You know, this comes up actually here quite often, just looking at the email paths that our different visitors and leads and customers receive along their lifetime. You know, we’ve kind of had that on autopilot for a little bit too long so we’re starting to see the staleness that happens and also what happens when you start adding more elements to that piece.

We have different tools that communicate with different people. We have internal application tools that notify or suggest features to specific users inside our applications. We have emails that go out using marketing automation. We have content emails that go out from a different path. And, oftentimes, we find ourselves stumbling upon ourselves and communicating with the same person too many times from different angles, and that’s because we got stale on the marketing automation side where things were just working so we left them.

We didn’t go back and say, “Okay. You know what? We changed our strategy in other areas so now we’ve got to go and refine what we’re doing inside,” – in our case, Hubspot, for how we’re targeting certain people at certain stages based on what we’ve already spoken to them about or what we’ve already sent them. It’s really, really important to keep looking and keep checking to make sure that you’re not making those kind of stumbles and you’re not relying too much on what you set up a long time ago.

CHARLES: Very good advice, yeah.

My favorite emails that I get are when something has automatically gone out to someone and someone emails me replies and emails me and says, “Thank you for this piece of information,” or whatever. I mean, they feel like it was personally written to them as an individual email. That’s the moment where I know, “Okay, great. That piece of content works because it elicited a personal response from someone.” That’s interesting that you say that because automation isn’t necessarily that good unless it can resonate with people in the way that they need it to.

YOAV: Yeah, absolutely. You know, when we automate stuff, ironically, we’re trying to create the illusion that it’s personal. When we screw up and we make it obvious that it’s automated, that’s when we really shoot ourselves in the foot. Really, we need to look at it as, “What would I send to this person on a personal level?” and “If I had to do that for a thousand people, obviously that would require tons of resources, how do I automate that but still make it sound genuine?”

CHARLES: There you go. That’s probably the best rule of thumb, right? If you would do that on an individual basis, then that makes sense. But, obviously, we can’t scale that to thousands of people so then we automate that so that’s great, yeah.

Excellent. That’s fantastic advice. I truly appreciate it.

I hope everyone has learned a little something today and won’t trip up on the seven deadly sins of automation.

Before we wrap things up, if the audience wants to use UberFlip for content marketing and you want to explore that and see what it’s all about, what kind of offers are there? What kind of trial offers are there?

YOAV: Sure. It’s really easy to get started with UberFlip. Go to our site – uberflip.com – click on that Free Trial button and you get a 14-day free trial to really, really test out everything that we have. We drop you right into the experience. You get to connect all of your content and we practice what we preach. It’s really designed for anybody to be able to use.

After a 14-day free trial, we start as low as $50 a month. Really palatable for even small businesses to get going. At $50 a month, the way I put it is you get a car with four wheels. You can truly test out the experience and see the effect that it has on your business and, obviously, we want you to pay us more so, as you discover the value that we’re giving you, we find it makes a lot of sense for a lot of B2B marketers.

CHARLES: Excellent. Okay, great. And there’s no credit card required for that initially?

YOAV: No, no credit card required to try it out.

CHARLES: Is that full access as well?

YOAV: Yeah, you get full access to pretty much all the features that we have from uploading your PDFs and turning them into engaging ebooks to connecting all of your social, your blog, your videos, curating content, creating an amazing user experience that works on phones, tablets, and desktops. You really do get to fly with this thing for free – no credit card required.

CHARLES: Oh, cool, very cool. Yeah, I’m glad you mentioned the PDF portion because I do know quite a few people who do PDF marketing and I like that UberFlip had a bunch of tools to be able to add additional features to the PDF and also be able to make it – if I’m correct in this – there’s a way to make it where you had to put in a passcode in order to get access to that, stuff like that.

YOAV: Yeah, we go pretty deep when it comes to ebooks or whitepapers. You can upload your PDF. We create an amazing flipbook or a page-flipping experience that works on phones, tablets, and desktops. You can password-protect it. You can drop social elements anywhere on any page. If you want to drop a YouTube video on a specific page rather than having flat image or add a tweet button or share button, you can do that all – all of it within this page-flipping experience. We really turn the PDF into a super amazing engaging experience for your users.

CHARLES: Which is great. Take it from something that’s just kind of a vanilla PDF and do something that’s really interactive. I like that idea. And I also love – by the way, I just want to say this – I love that you guys are doing mobile responsive so, when you’re working with these hubs and things like that, on UberFlip, you can see what it’s going to look like on the tablet or on the phone or on the desktop browser and that just makes so much sense. I wish more companies would embrace that obvious thing that needs to be embraced.

You guys are doing a great job.

YOAV: Any screen at this point. You know, there’s a new screen size coming out every five minutes. It’s really about being able to be in front of your audience wherever they are and whatever they’re on, even on their wearable device of the future and just being able to have a great experience no matter where they are.

CHARLES: Okay. Well, very cool. There you go, guys. Go try it out – uberflip.com.

Thank you, Yoav. I appreciate it. It’s been fun and it’s been a great topic.

Be sure to rate Open Source Marketer and, if you’re on iTunes, be sure to rate the podcast and thumbs up on YouTube. Also, like us on Facebook. If you have any questions at all, be sure to post them on the Facebook page. I’ll make sure that you get an answer.

Until next time.

YOAV: Thank you Charles

The post 7 Deadly Sins of Content Marketing Automation with UberFlip CEO, Yoav Schwartz appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12508/seven-deadly-sins-of-content-marketing-automation/feed/ 0 Content Marketing,Marketing Automation Today's Open Source Marketer podcast guest is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip. - UberFlip makes content marketing and marketing automation push button easy for marketers who want to aggregate content into valuable hubs without... Today's Open Source Marketer podcast guest is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip. UberFlip makes content marketing and marketing automation push button easy for marketers who want to aggregate content into valuable hubs without involving designers or a development team. Everything in UberFlip is drag-and-drop and you can even add external services like Google Analytics, Mailchimp, HubSpot, and Marketo. There's a clear focus on lead generation using relevant content and they even provide the ability to make some or all of your content gated so visitors have to give up their email before interacting with content. During our conversation, Yoav covered the 7 deadly sins of marketing automation and how marketers can avoid making the mistakes that keep them from reaching their goals. A full transcript of the conversation is provided below. If you're interested in creating a content hub that focuses on lead generation, sign up for a 14 day free trial of UberFlip. There's no coding required and it's insanely simple to manage. Have questions? Let's continue the conversation on Facebook. Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com Full Transcript: CHARLES MCKEEVER: All right! Welcome back to Open Source Marketer! I’m your host, Charles McKeever, and today’s topic centers around content marketing and the seven deadly sins of marketing automation. Joining us today is content marketing expert, Yoav Schwartz, CEO of UberFlip. Yoav, thanks for joining us today! YOAV SCHWARTZ: Happy to be here! CHARLES: Awesome. Now, before we jump into the seven deadly sins, let’s back up just a few steps and define for the audience what is content marketing and what is marketing automation? YOAV: Sure. So, interesting place to start; the way we define UberFlip really is content marketing automation so a combination of those two topics. Content marketing is really leveraging content and really borrowing thoughtful pieces that are meant to passively find visitors or your audience, engage them – whether it’s helpful content, snacky content, whatever it might be – with the purpose of passively selling them what you’re selling. Rather than very aggressively giving a sales pitch, provide content that is useful. Create yourself as a source of great resources around a certain topic that resonates with your audience so that they keep you top of mind when they are ready to make a purchasing decision. Marketing automation is really built on a foundation of email. If you think about tools like Marketo or Hubspot or Eloqua, the real automation comes in the ability of how to send different people down different tracks in order to email them or send them offers, depending on what stage they are in in the buying process. So, taking somebody from an unknown person such as a visitor on your website and nurturing them all the way to becoming a customer. Along that path, you want to send them different messages, you want to put them down different tracks, different lists within your marketing automation tool so that you can send them relevant information to nurture them and get them through that path to customer and beyond. CHARLES: Okay. Then you’re definitely a fan of marketing automation then? YOAV: Yeah, we’re big fans. I mean, we use marketing automation for Hubspot customers. There’s definitely a need for both content and marketing automation in any marketing strategy. CHARLES: Okay. Well, I want to talk more about that when we get to the portion about automation and our seven deadly sins because, you know, I’m sure there are some caveats to that as well. All right. So, let’s talk then about UberFliip for just a minute. Let’s define exactly what UberFlip does and how it approaches marketing. YOAV: Sure. What we do at UberFlip is, again, we’re content marketing automation; we automate a lot of the complexities around an effective content strategy. Charles McKeever no 33:16
Using Social Profile Data to Know Your Customers with Janrain VP of Marketing, Jamie Beckland http://opensourcemarketer.com/12412/using-social-profile-data-know-customers-janrain-vp-marketing-jamie-beckland/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12412/using-social-profile-data-know-customers-janrain-vp-marketing-jamie-beckland/#comments Fri, 13 Jun 2014 15:52:24 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12412

Today’s Open Source Marketer podcast guest is Jamie Beckland, VP of Marketing and Customer Success for Janrain. Janrain provides customer profile management across a variety of social networks, online platforms, and devices. Jamie runs the Digital and Social Media Strategy team for Janrain. He built his first international social community in 2004, and since then has developed digital marketing strategies for clients including Fox, Schlage, Dr Pepper, AOL, Wells Fargo, KinderCare, The Brookings Institution and many others. He frequently speaks and writes for Mashable, Social Media Examiner, iMediaConnection and other publications. During our conversation, Jamie provided insights into the changing landscape...

The post Using Social Profile Data to Know Your Customers with Janrain VP of Marketing, Jamie Beckland appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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Today’s Open Source Marketer podcast guest is Jamie Beckland, VP of Marketing and Customer Success for Janrain. Janrain provides customer profile management across a variety of social networks, online platforms, and devices. Jamie runs the Digital and Social Media Strategy team for Janrain. He built his first international social community in 2004, and since then has developed digital marketing strategies for clients including Fox, Schlage, Dr Pepper, AOL, Wells Fargo, KinderCare, The Brookings Institution and many others. He frequently speaks and writes for Mashable, Social Media Examiner, iMediaConnection and other publications.

During our conversation, Jamie provided insights into the changing landscape of customer profile management. We discussed the importance of having a complete picture of customer preferences and we talked about why cookie based tracking doesn’t work and what we can do to ensure that customers are having a good user experience across multiple properties and devices.

A full transcript of the conversation is provided below. It’s an excellent read with lots of great insights. I highly recommend, you either listen to the podcast, watch the video, or read the transcript. What Jamie shares is truly eye-opening.

Have questions?

Let’s continue the conversation on Facebook.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

Full Transcript:

CHARLES MCKEEVER: All right! Welcome back to Open Source Marketer!

I’m your host, Charles McKeever, and today we’re talking about how to customize interactions with your customers using social profile data.

Joining us to explore the topic is Jamie Beckland, VP of Customer Success at Janrain.

Jamie, thanks for being here!

JAMIE BECKLAND: Yeah, thanks for having me!

CHARLES: Jamie is an expert in today’s topic.

He’s helped Fortune 1000 companies integrate social media technologies into their websites to improve their acquisition and engagement. He’s worked with private entities, government, universities, and non-profit, and he’s also written for a variety of publications including Mashable, Social Media Examiner, and iMediaConnnection. So, we’re thrilled to have him here with us today on Open Source Marketer.

Now, in addition to personalizing your user’s experience, we’re also going to touch on social media privacy, managing your brand’s reputation without being creepy, and the end of online identity demographics.

So, before we dive into all of that, Jamie, tell us about Janrain. What does Janrain do?

JAMIE: Sure. Janrain manages customer profiles for brands and websites. So, any time you want to create an account, that could be a traditional username and password, or it could be using a social profile to manage the authentication. We’re very concerned with making sure that a user is who they say they are, so that means they have to have control over a password or a social media account in order to be able to authenticate. And then, sharing and managing all of the data that comes back about that user and integrating it into the rest of the marketing technology stack.

CHARLES: Okay. So, you guys are the data providers to larger organizations then? I mean, it sounds like you’re kind of a central hub for that kind of thing.

JAMIE: That’s right. We really do act as a central database or a central record for understanding all of those different aspects about who your customer is. So, you have interactions that happen on your website – you know, clickstream data, sort of when they watch a video, when they interact with a certain piece of content – and we’d store and manage all of that data.

You also have social profile data. So, the information that’s on your Facebook profile or your Twitter profile, Google+, et cetera. Each one of those has a different idea of who that user is and has different data. So, whenever the user authenticates with any of those identities, we pull that data back also.

And then, you have the notion of sort of third-party data that you might want to integrate into your infrastructure also. So, data assets around sort of what kind of car do they drive, how big their mortgage is – that kind of data. We can also store and manage that.

And then, of course, we want to push it around to everyone in the marketing technology infrastructure. So, if you want to personalize emails, if you want to change the content on your CMS, if you want to sort of create audience segmentation to use in offline channels – all of that can be managed from within our platform.

CHARLES: So then, as a business owner, I’d be collecting information about my customer locally, but then I don’t have the overall bigger picture about some of their other preferences that might be outside the context of our normal conversations with the customer. Is that accurate?

JAMIE: Yeah, that’s right. What we’ve found is that the notion of a customer identity or a customer profile is something that almost every marketing infrastructure component needs. So, of course, if you want to send somebody emails, you need a place to manage those email addresses. And then, if you want to serve custom content within a content management system, you need a system for that. Each one of those has different requirements about what they need to know about the user. And so, the challenge is how do you get a consolidated view of who your customer is, right? By using somebody like a Janrain, you’re going to centralize all the data about your customer in one place and then share different versions or different portions of the profile with different systems.

CHARLES: Now, how does that work long-term? So, who owns the data in that situation? Is that something that I can get access to that information and then build my own local profile over time? How does that work?

JAMIE: Yeah, absolutely. So, you know, Janrain is very much focused on supporting our customers to get to know their customers better so that means, of course, we don’t want to control or maintain any rights or privileges to your data. Your data is your data. Your customers are your customers. And I think that’s a really important component, especially if you look at the marketing landscape where people are sort of renting your customers, right? You can go buy this customer. Every time you want to, you can come to our channel; you know, buy access to that customer and then talk to them.

We think about it a little bit differently. We think that relationship with your brand or your website is going to be the most important relationship to maintain. Obviously, that means that you can export, you can feed that data into any other system where you want to use it, and we do have a lot of customers who use us in conjunction with a data warehouse – maybe a more back-end process that stores it more for long-term.

But we also find that, you know, the service really becomes crucial when you’re dealing with online real-time interaction landscapes. So, if you want to personalize content on the next page-turn, the next page on the website that the user visits, you really need that data to be accessible in real-time or in near real-time. So, you know, that’s why having both of those aspects, having both of those options to store on the back-end can also make it available on the front-end. It’s so important.

CHARLES: Okay. So, we said one of the things we were going to talk about was managing the brand’s identity and things like that, but it seems like you have to get people to sign up for something before you can even start this process. So, take me through the different phases of interaction. What does that look like?

JAMIE: Yeah, absolutely.

If you think about it from a customer journey perspective, it’s exactly what you’re talking about. The customer needs to go through a process to go from being an anonymous user to a known user, and there’s a bunch of steps along that process. That means that, over time, the user is showing more trust in your brand, they want to learn more, they want to increase their commitment and they want to increase their investment in the relationship.

When we think about that journey that the customer goes through, this notion of what are they giving up and what are they getting at each step of the marketing process becomes so important, right? So, there’s certain moments that are high-value moments – if you want to give access to a discount or an offer; if you want to provide an opportunity to join or participate in a campaign, a contest, or a promotion; if you want to gain an asset or resource that’s very high-value, you know, giving away a lot of information. And then, you can ask for a relatively robust amount of data in return for that. You know, maybe you want to ask for not just their name and their email address, but maybe you also want to know their location, maybe you want to know their social graph because you want to be able to share with their friends and their contacts. So, you want to look at the data assets that the user’s going to be comfortable sharing for the particular asset or experience that they’re participating in.

And then, what you want to do is map out a whole series of different interactions that increase in their depth and commitment over time so that you’re asking for more and more data from different sources about that user to build that profile.

You know, this is a little bit different than the way people think about marketing campaigns now, right? A campaign is a very sort of focused or temporal thing. You know, you’re going to do your summer campaign or your back-to-school campaign. We see it very differently. We see that campaigns need to build off of each other so that you’re having a conversation with your customer over time and you’re getting to know them better. And in getting to know them better, it gives them more and more value.

CHARLES: I have seen that, over time, clients have begun to warm up to this idea of being social. You know, a lot of people have early on said, “I want to be in social media, but I don’t want to be social, all right? I really don’t want to interact with anybody, but I want to somehow benefit from social media,” and it’s kind of a weird juxtaposition, but they’ve warmed up to it and now it seems like just what you said. People are trying to do campaigns, but those campaigns are these pockets or these islands where they want the people to pay attention at the time that they want them to pay attention, but that person has no reason to pay attention at that time. There’s no on-going conversation for them to be invested in. So, it’s interesting.

JAMIE: Yeah. I mean, I think the fact of the matter is that marketers are not in control anymore – if they ever were in the first place. Well, I mean, maybe there was a time – you know, when we all watched the Ed Sullivan Show – that a marketer really had a chance to drive a national dialogue or a national conversation to say, you know, when the audience is so concentrated, it becomes easy for the marketer to say, “Okay. Well, they don’t have anything better to do. They have to watch one of these three television channels, right?”

That’s not the world we live in and there are so many competing priorities for attention, and it’s not just digital versus digital, right? It’s digital versus TV versus radio versus spending time with your kids versus your iPad and your Amazon Fire and all of this. So, in that increasingly fragmented landscape, attention goes where the most interesting or engaging opportunity is.

And so, I think you’re right; I think the initial thoughts for marketers were, “Okay. This is another channel. This is another channel where I start to have a voice and I participate, but I get to control when this happens and what the level of dialogue is.” What we’re seeing now is that, you know, if you want to attract attention, you need to have something that fits in with the user’s lifestyle, with the way the customer’s thinking about you.

CHARLES: That makes a lot of sense, and I like what you said about matching the value proposition – whatever it is that you’re offering – to the ask. So, you know, you’re not asking that person for an inordinate amount of information if they’re just going to register. So, I think that’s along those lines of not being creepy, you know?

JAMIE: Yeah, exactly! I mean, it’s such a key part of the privacy conversation, right? It’s very top-of-mind right now because people know, they understand that they’re adding value into these channels, into these social channels, but what they don’t have a good feeling of is what’s available, what’s public. What am I sharing with different brands? Is what I’m sharing with different brands the same or different? And what do my friends see about my interactions on some of these other websites when they use my social data?

So, it creates this discomfort with users and, you know, it’s just this notion of, “What data am I sharing with you? What are you going to do with that data? Why is it valuable? And why should I feel comfortable sharing it with you?” It really gets down to some core issues of trust in your brand, in your website, and in your products that it really is dependent. That’s why, you know, sometimes, people talk about marketing as a weak force. I think that marketing has incredible power and potential, but if people don’t have trust or confidence in the product or in your brand, then there’s no amount of marketing that’s going to be able to overcome that right from the social perspective.

CHARLES: Absolutely. Yeah, Facebook’s going through a lot of that, having to figure out exactly where people’s comfort zones are and how far they can go with sharing their private information and what constitutes frictionless sharing versus “I don’t want people to know that.” It’s a very interesting topic.

JAMIE: Yeah.

CHARLES: So, along those lines, I saw on the Janrain website that you guys have a login widget or an offering where people can kind of register quickly for a service or a website. How is that different than something like a Facebook login plug-in for a WordPress site?

JAMIE: Yeah, sure. So, Facebook login, you know, this Facebook identity product has been around since about 2009 and it was at that time where we really looked at this landscape and said, “Identity on the internet is a complicated proposition and it’s difficult for users to feel comfortable putting all of their identity eggs in one basket.”

So, the reality is that, for some brands, for some websites, a user might be comfortable using their Facebook account; for others, they may feel more comfortable with Google+; with others, they may be more comfortable with Twitter. What we said was, “Look, it’s really important for developers and marketing teams to have an easy way to interact with all of these different identity providers.” So, that’s what we designed in our social login product and it’s what’s really sort of different or broader than a Facebook login.

With Facebook, you’re doing the technical integration for one identity provider. With Janrain, you’re doing the technical integration once, but you have access to over thirty different identity providers. So, you get your Facebook – you know, that comes with it – but you have other options too, and that means that you can align with different customers, what they’re more comfortable with, and you also have opportunities to gather data from additional identity providers too. And, if you think about your own experience using social media, you probably share different kind of content and different parts of yourself on, say, a LinkedIn than you do on Facebook. So, getting an understanding of that holistic customer perspective through multiple identities, I think it ends up being really important.

CHARLES: That’s great. And so, you guys then pull all that together on the back side so that, regardless of how they log in, you can still track their profile and their preferences and things like that. Is that kind of what I’m understanding?

JAMIE: Yes, exactly. So, of course, from Janrain’s perspective, we want to have a unified view of the customer at all times so we do provide account mapping functionality to map that same user’s Facebook profile to their Twitter profile to the next and the next profile. That sort of comes out of the box from our perspective. The data is stored within a single customer record, but then you can always look at that specific view. “Let’s look at the Facebook-only data or the Twitter-only data.” So, you could see, you know, who is this user? How are they different in different places?

CHARLES: Okay. And do you see more people using the social logins than over traditional registration forms? How does that break down?

JAMIE: Yeah, it’s a great question.

You know, social login is the answer to a user experience nightmare which is a username and password. What we’ve seen is that 96 percent of users – we’ve been running surveys for five years – almost 100 percent of users have gotten mis-targeted information and communications because the data is not really good enough.

About 77 percent of users would rather use a social login than to create a new traditional username and password. We did a kind of fun survey that looked at how loved are passwords, right? 40 percent of internet users would rather clean the toilet than create another password to remember. So, it solves a real problem from the user’s perspective. I mean, I don’t know about you, but that’s probably about the last thing on my list.

CHARLES: Yeah.

From a personal perspective, I tend to use social logins just because all my information is already there. You know, why should I have to fill all that stuff out again? It’s kind of like going to the doctor. You know, they make you fill out the form and then you have to fill out the form again. You’re like, “Well, I’ve already filled out the form. Why do I need to do this twice?” So, social logins definitely make a lot of sense.

So, let’s switch gears a little bit and talk about this concept of the end of online identity demographics. Okay. What does that mean?

JAMIE: Yeah. So, the web is about twenty years old now and I think what we’ve learned, we went through a sort of a long phase – and, you know, we’re at the tail-end of it – where there was a really robust conversation about whether people should be able to be anonymous online. I think we’re at the point now where we can see there always going to be a place where people can be anonymous and you can sort of go into the dark corners of the internet if you want to. But, for the most part, you’re going to have to be known in some way, shape, or form. And what you’re seeing on top of that is this fragmentation. We talked about fragmentation in terms of media, right? You have a lot of different media channels that you can access. What it does is it takes traditional marketing objectives around demographics and adds this new overlay on top of it which is all of your psychographic concerns.

So, demographics, you know, traditionally, if you could get ZIP, age, and gender, that was about as much targeting as you could do from a marketing perspective, right? So, you know, you can buy your billboards, you can buy your TV ads, you can buy your radio spots with just those three data points alone and you didn’t need to know a lot about an individual person in order to get that kind of information or get that information aggregated.

What we’re moving to now is people in different parts of the buying cycle at different time and much more fragmented interests. So, demographics aren’t really enough. I mean, I would even make the argument that demographics do a very poor job now of indicating what somebody’s going to be interested in.

I’ll take a really small example. I’m sure every one of the people in the audience knows somebody who is not sort of a “Gen-Y” or not a “millennial,” but they have made a commitment to being a digital native, right? So, if you’re a digital native, it means that you want to experiment with new digital platforms. It means that you naturally can see a use case or some interest or excitement when you download a new app. Those are things that you’re doing not because you’re forced to because it’s your job but because, you know, that’s who you are, right? You sort of embrace that.

I would say that a digital native, regardless of their age, has much more in common with each other than they do with somebody who just happens to be the same age or the same gender as them and that’s this notion of interest – this notion of psychographics being so much more powerful than demographics. So, what it does is, you know, people still think about demographics a lot, but they’re a relatively weak force and they’re getting weaker and weaker over time. And what’s sort of rising in their place is this notion that, if you can find people who share a like-mind around a topic, around an interest, that’s what’s going to drive conversation, that’s what’s going to drive engagement, and, ultimately, that’s what’s going to drive customers.

CHARLES: That’s a very good point, yeah, because knowing someone’s age might tell you whether or not they have kids, it might tell you whether or not they have stability in their job or something like that, but it only goes so far. You’re absolutely right so that makes a lot of sense.

Well, you know, when Facebook first came out and it had all this demographic information, maybe even farther than demographic information, that was kind of a holy grail for marketers, you know? People being able to get down to ten people in Oklahoma who are interested in this one thing, you know? I mean, how does Janrain differ from Facebook demographics?

JAMIE: Yeah. So, we actually take data from Facebook and store it on behalf of the brand. You know, one of the biggest differences is that Facebook is great if you want to access an audience that’s within the Facebook platform and, you know, people spend some time on Facebook, right? They usually spend about an hour a day on Facebook. That means that they’re interacting with media for another eight or nine hours into the day that’s not on Facebook. When you think more broadly about, “how do I connect with this customer everywhere that I might want to talk with them?” it really means that you want the data to live within your own infrastructure. That doesn’t mean that you don’t use those Facebook tools, but you use them for a specific purpose at a specific time in the customer journey.

You know, for us, what we want to do is integrate those same data assets into something that allows you to communicate with them very presently – like, when they’re on your own website – and that’s not something that, typically, people are segmenting within their own website, but it’s really actually not that difficult to take one message and version it into four or six messages and then continue on building more and more personalized content over time. So, it really becomes a way to have that Facebook style experience or Facebook level of personalization across all of your digital touch points.

CHARLES: Okay. So, that’s a great point to transition. A moment ago you mentioned fragmentation with multiple properties, multiple websites, things like that. How has mobile factored into all of this? Because, now, we are on our tablets, we are on our phones and our desktop computers and things like that. How does that factor across? “How is mobile being used to engage customers?” I guess, is my question.

JAMIE: Yeah. I mean, what I’ve been hearing since about 2010 is, you know, this is the year of mobile; 2011, this is the year of mobile. Now it feels like in ’14, it feels like mobile came and smacked a bunch of marketers upside the head, right? I mean, all of a sudden, you know, you sort of hit that tipping point around smartphone adoption and penetration, crossing 50 percent of the cell phone audience. And, all of a sudden, everybody has a browser in their pocket and they’re interacting on mobile. So, you know, we see customers, I don’t think we have a customer where less than 20 percent of their website traffic is from mobile, and some of them, it’s like 70, 80 percent.

CHARLES: Wow.

JAMIE: And then, you have this mobile-first or mobile-only kind of perspective where you have a bunch of apps and innovation happening there where they don’t even have a website at all. So, it’s really fundamentally changed the way that people think about computing and being connected.

It was interesting, I was talking to somebody from Google the other day and they said that, when you think about why mobile is so important and why it’s so useful, it really comes from this very fundamental concept about people that everything is better when it’s portable. I mean, everything that you could possibly do – you know, food is better when it’s portable and you can throw a granola bar in your backpack and have it any time you want. I mean, everything, just everything that people interact with is better when it’s portable and mobile is just the latest to get there.

So, it’s a natural progression for all of our users. We’re going to have to deal with it. It causes some big challenges when it comes to identity and knowing your customer because we’ve built this infrastructure over fifteen years that’s based on cookies and cookies are tied to a device. So, you have this cookie that gets dropped on your device and then it follows you around as you look at the internet and look at your own properties. And then, the cookie is the thing that approximates, “Well, this is Charles,” or, “This is Jamie.” As soon as you move to another device, they drop a new cookie and you start from zero, and you don’t even have the ability in all the mobile devices to drop cookies.

So, you know, this is where you hear in the landscape people saying that the cookie is dead or that cookies are dying, that’s what they’re talking about. They’re talking about it’s just not that useful anymore. So, you have to look at a different way to connect that user’s identity across multiple devices.

There’s a few different options. I mean, you could look at device fingerprinting and those kinds of things. What we’ve seen when we’ve looked at those technologies is that they really only have about a 40 or 60 percent success rate. So, I mean, it’s like a coin toss. Are you going to really trust that this is the user that you think they are when, you know, 50 percent of the time they’re going to be wrong? Really, the only way to do that is through looking at a login – a login where somebody’s connecting their one single identity to the desktop through the browser and then, also, secondarily, through the tablet or through the phone. So, you know, you use login as that way to connect that user across multiple devices. And, all of a sudden, you’re actually much further accelerated because you have not only that identity, but then you have all the data to be able to push and pull into different places.

Okay. So, it’s really interesting. When you start doing that, what you find is that the customer journey that you thought that you had is very different from the customer journey that your users actually go through, right? So, you have this idea mapped out in your head, “Oh, they’re going to find me, you know, they’re going to come to my website and then they’re going to download my app and then, you know, they’re going to buy something on the app and then they’re going to look at it in their email or something like that.”

What we’re seeing is that the user journey is actually really, really different from that, right? Instead, you’re finding out through social in your phone, through an email that gets pushed to you so you go do the app download directly. The first experience is mobile then they might get pushed to your website later. It causes you to rethink the whole way that you think about sort of how that customer gets to know you. It’s really, really powerful.

CHARLES: That’s amazing, yeah. That’s incredible and it makes complete sense what you said about mobile being personal because mobile devices are very personal. Like you said, a granola bar. I’ve never thought of it in that way, but it is very personal, and we spend so much time with it that it just makes sense want to bring that into the conversation and track people across all those different devices. It’s amazing stuff.

JAMIE: Yeah. I mean, it’s really interesting, especially on the heels of some of the Apple announcements from WWDC yesterday with the iOS 8 announcements, and that’s sort of building on some of the functionality you see in the Android platform, right?

So, a big push on these mobile devices is, if you use your social identity or your device identity to log into a website, then you could push your mobile app directly without having them sign in again, right? Your Google identity is tied to the Android so they can push you in over there install, right? So, if part of your strategy is to do push notifications from a mobile device, then you need to have that app installed, right? So, if you can get that app installed, that’s been a big a big barrier. How do you discover apps if you’ve been in the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store and try to find a new, interesting, exciting app? Like, it’s almost impossible, right?

CHARLES: Right.

JAMIE: So, you really need better delivery mechanisms for those apps, and this over-the-air install through social login is a huge value-add. So, if you’re a marketer that’s trying to push more adoption of your mobile apps, this is a huge area to investigate.

CHARLES: Yeah, absolutely. I know that there’s a lot of iOS developers in the Austin area who are very excited by those announcements and, you know, looking at that for marketing purposes, for sure.

Well, all right, Jamie. Thank you for spending some time with us and talking about this topic. I think that we’ve got a good idea of what Janrain can do and what we should be thinking about in the space of marketing to people across multiple platforms using multiple devices and creating a customized experience for them so that we can have a conversation and not just have these pocketed silos of campaigns where we want people to pay attention when we want them to and we can actually have a much better response if we can have a conversation with them that’s on-going. So, thank you for that. I really appreciate it.

How can someone in the audience get started if they want to? What’s the first thing that they should do?

JAMIE: Yeah. The first thing that you should do is take a look at the data assets that are available. We actually have a tool that can help you do that on our website, it’s the Janrain Social Profile Navigator. So, you can go there and you can log in and you can actually see the assets that might be available from within your own platform.

And then, think about how you would use that data if you had access to it. If you knew who that user was and what data you had access to, what would you change in your own experience?

CHARLES: Yeah. Okay. There you go. Go check out Janrain.com. They’ve got great videos over there, case studies, white papers. I was really impressed by how much information you guys had on the website. It was really great to kind of navigate and figure out what exactly the conversation was and where we should be focusing. So, definitely go check out Janrain.

And, also, while you’re online, remember to subscribe to Open Source Marketer and rate the podcast on YouTube and iTunes or wherever you listen.

Jamie, thank you again for being here.

Thanks for tuning in and I look forward to seeing you all next time.

JAMIE: Thank you.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12412/using-social-profile-data-know-customers-janrain-vp-marketing-jamie-beckland/feed/ 0 Social Profile Data Today's Open Source Marketer podcast guest is Jamie Beckland, VP of Marketing and Customer Success for Janrain. Janrain provides customer profile management across a variety of social networks, online platforms, and devices. Today's Open Source Marketer podcast guest is Jamie Beckland, VP of Marketing and Customer Success for Janrain. Janrain provides customer profile management across a variety of social networks, online platforms, and devices. Jamie runs the Digital and Social Media Strategy team for Janrain. He built his first international social community in 2004, and since then has developed digital marketing strategies for clients including Fox, Schlage, Dr Pepper, AOL, Wells Fargo, KinderCare, The Brookings Institution and many others. He frequently speaks and writes for Mashable, Social Media Examiner, iMediaConnection and other publications. During our conversation, Jamie provided insights into the changing landscape of customer profile management. We discussed the importance of having a complete picture of customer preferences and we talked about why cookie based tracking doesn't work and what we can do to ensure that customers are having a good user experience across multiple properties and devices. A full transcript of the conversation is provided below. It's an excellent read with lots of great insights. I highly recommend, you either listen to the podcast, watch the video, or read the transcript. What Jamie shares is truly eye-opening. Have questions? Let's continue the conversation on Facebook. Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com Full Transcript: CHARLES MCKEEVER: All right! Welcome back to Open Source Marketer! I’m your host, Charles McKeever, and today we’re talking about how to customize interactions with your customers using social profile data. Joining us to explore the topic is Jamie Beckland, VP of Customer Success at Janrain. Jamie, thanks for being here! JAMIE BECKLAND: Yeah, thanks for having me! CHARLES: Jamie is an expert in today’s topic. He’s helped Fortune 1000 companies integrate social media technologies into their websites to improve their acquisition and engagement. He’s worked with private entities, government, universities, and non-profit, and he’s also written for a variety of publications including Mashable, Social Media Examiner, and iMediaConnnection. So, we’re thrilled to have him here with us today on Open Source Marketer. Now, in addition to personalizing your user’s experience, we’re also going to touch on social media privacy, managing your brand’s reputation without being creepy, and the end of online identity demographics. So, before we dive into all of that, Jamie, tell us about Janrain. What does Janrain do? JAMIE: Sure. Janrain manages customer profiles for brands and websites. So, any time you want to create an account, that could be a traditional username and password, or it could be using a social profile to manage the authentication. We’re very concerned with making sure that a user is who they say they are, so that means they have to have control over a password or a social media account in order to be able to authenticate. And then, sharing and managing all of the data that comes back about that user and integrating it into the rest of the marketing technology stack. CHARLES: Okay. So, you guys are the data providers to larger organizations then? I mean, it sounds like you’re kind of a central hub for that kind of thing. JAMIE: That’s right. We really do act as a central database or a central record for understanding all of those different aspects about who your customer is. So, you have interactions that happen on your website – you know, clickstream data, sort of when they watch a video, when they interact with a certain piece of content – and we’d store and manage all of that data. You also have social profile data. So, the information that’s on your Facebook profile or your Twitter profile, Google+, et cetera. Each one of those has a different idea of who that user is and has different data. So, whenever the user authenticates with any of those identities, we pull that data back also. And then, Charles McKeever no 29:56
Who Can You Trust? How Do You Make Sure? http://opensourcemarketer.com/12408/can-trust-make-sure/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12408/can-trust-make-sure/#comments Mon, 09 Jun 2014 00:57:27 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12408

Last summer, MIT Sloan Management Review published a research study about the lack of consumer trust in the market place. Among other things, the study examined why trustees are so wary when it comes to online providers. The study is worth a read—our reasons for feeling wary are well earned. In this article, though, we thought it would be useful to teach consumers how to figure out for themselves whether or not a company is actually trustworthy—especially since, ironically, so much trust can be faked! As someone who will likely have to consider outsourcing some (or maybe even most) of...

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Last summer, MIT Sloan Management Review published a research study about the lack of consumer trust in the market place. Among other things, the study examined why trustees are so wary when it comes to online providers. The study is worth a read—our reasons for feeling wary are well earned.

In this article, though, we thought it would be useful to teach consumers how to figure out for themselves whether or not a company is actually trustworthy—especially since, ironically, so much trust can be faked!

As someone who will likely have to consider outsourcing some (or maybe even most) of your business’s operations, here are the things you should be doing to make sure that the company you’re thinking of hiring to take over, say, your customer service or payroll is legitimate. And, by extension, these are the areas in which you need to make sure that you excel if you want people to actually spend their hard earned money on your products and services.

Check the Company’s Information

Even as a web-based business, it is important that you have a presence in the brick and mortar world. If you can’t find a street address or a phone number for a company anywhere, consumers tread very carefully.

Yes, you already know from your own startup days that the cheapest way to get a street address is to buy a UPS box or to rent a virtual office, but you also know that you were there to answer the phone (or answer Skype if you were really tight on cash) when someone called. If a company will only communicate via email, that is a huge warning sign and you should probably move on.

You should also run the listed phone number through a reverse 411. If the company pops up on all sorts of harassment sites, proceed with extreme caution!

Check Online Information

Spend some time doing a registry search on the company’s domain name. You can find out all sorts of great information (like who registered the name, the address at which the domain is registered, etc). The detail you really want to look at is the date of the registration. If a web business claims that it has been doing business online for a decade and the domain name was only registered two weeks ago, that’s a red flag.

Yes, sometimes there is an explanation—maybe, for example, the company moved to a new domain name. Don’t be afraid to ask about the discrepancy if you’re curious. Any company worth your money will be able to both explain the discrepancy and give you whatever information on previous websites, company names, etc that you want or need.

Reputation Check

As a webpreneur, you already know how to build a great online reputation and how to do regular reputation maintenance and repair. But do you know how to check someone else’s reputation? There’s more to it than simply Googling the company and looking at the first couple of pages of responses.

Search for the business with the Secretary of State in which the company claims to be registered. Look for complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau. You can even check for fraud complaints with the FTC. An online reputation can be manipulated at the basic level. It cannot, however, be manipulated at the state and federal level.

Is That Business Verified? Through a Trustworthy Party?

  • Look for verification from reputable third party “gate keepers”. For example, you know how when you want to make sure that a company’s shopping carts are secured, you take a second to make sure that the site is protected by VeriSign? And how you usually look for a grade from the Better Business Bureau? Another good one to check for is the IAB. IAB is a quality compliance list that measures the legitimacy of a site’s and a company’s advertising methods.
  • With so much manipulation happening on sites like Yelp and Angie’s list (where the reviews look legit but the rating of a business is more dependent upon how much advertising revenue it pays or generates for the site), it is important to make sure that the reviews you’re looking at weren’t bought and that the site on which you’re reading those reviews isn’t manipulating your results for its own financial gain.

Signs to Look for When Reading Reviews

Speaking of reading reviews, advertising compliance isn’t the only thing worth looking at when you’re checking out a company’s reviews. Look at a company’s entire review portal. There are specific flags—white and red—that you want to look for when trying to figure out if the review is from a legitimate consumer and not from someone who simply wants to promote or denigrate the company.

Look for product or service specs. It’s easy to plaster the web with “they’re awesome!” or “they suck!” reviews. It’s harder to go into specifics.

  • Check for similar language. Yes sometimes the exact same review shared across a dozen sites is just sour grapes (or whatever the positive version of sour grades is). Often, though, it is a sign that someone is trying to destroy a company’s reputation.
  • Does the review link out to a competing product? That’s a huge red flag.
  • A specific description of what does or does not work for the user is important—not just product specs but why it works for that person, specifically. The more detail, the better.

The best way to make sure that your customers can trust you is to ensure that you would pass your own standards test. What do you look for when you’re trying to figure out what to buy or who to hire? Now apply that to your own company. Would you buy your products? Would you hire yourself for your services based on what you’ve found?

If not—why? What do you need to change?

These areas are probably a few great places to start.

Have questions? Let’s continue the conversation on the Open Source Marketer Facebook Page.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

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Be More Productive with Clients, Staff, and Business Partners http://opensourcemarketer.com/12304/improve-productivity-with-clients-staff-and-business-partners/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12304/improve-productivity-with-clients-staff-and-business-partners/#comments Wed, 04 Jun 2014 20:25:18 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12304

Collaborating with clients via shared screens is a great way to save time and speed up conversations. In the past I’ve used solutions like Join.me, Skype, GotoMeeting, and Google+ Hangouts. Each solution has it’s pros and cons. Picking the right screen sharing solution really depends on your client and your project needs. Here’s a new solution I just came across that looks very interesting. I just completed a 30 minute call with a developer friend and we were able to switch back and forth between out desktops, edit, and interact with apps and the audio and video quality was flawless....

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Collaborating with clients via shared screens is a great way to save time and speed up conversations. In the past I’ve used solutions like Join.me, Skype, GotoMeeting, and Google+ Hangouts. Each solution has it’s pros and cons. Picking the right screen sharing solution really depends on your client and your project needs. Here’s a new solution I just came across that looks very interesting.

I just completed a 30 minute call with a developer friend and we were able to switch back and forth between out desktops, edit, and interact with apps and the audio and video quality was flawless. I’m blown away!!! And, it’s free…for how long, I don’t know, but I would gladly pay regardless.

Do you have a recommended solution you like to use? Tell me about it on Facebook.

Thanks for watching, listening, rating and subscribing.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

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Creating Children’s Books with Artist, Author and App Developer, Greg Pugh http://opensourcemarketer.com/12192/creating-childrens-book-apps-with-book-author-greg-pugh/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12192/creating-childrens-book-apps-with-book-author-greg-pugh/#comments Wed, 28 May 2014 16:39:45 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12192

Have you ever had an idea for a children’s book, but thought it would take too much to develop? Well, listen in as today’s guest shares his experience with designing, developing, and publishing a children’s book, and companion app for iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire. Take note of how he came up with the idea, how he developed the story, and what he does to keep the process fun. Be sure to check out his studio website and his children’s book site for more details. Have questions?  Let’s talk about them in the comments below. Thanks for watching, listening, rating and...

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Have you ever had an idea for a children’s book, but thought it would take too much to develop? Well, listen in as today’s guest shares his experience with designing, developing, and publishing a children’s book, and companion app for iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire.

Take note of how he came up with the idea, how he developed the story, and what he does to keep the process fun. Be sure to check out his studio website and his children’s book site for more details.

Have questions?  Let’s talk about them in the comments below.

Thanks for watching, listening, rating and subscribing.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

The post Creating Children’s Books with Artist, Author and App Developer, Greg Pugh appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12192/creating-childrens-book-apps-with-book-author-greg-pugh/feed/ 0 App Development Have you ever had an idea for a children's book, but thought it would take too much to develop? Well, listen in as today's guest shares his experience with designing, developing, and publishing a children's book, and companion app for iOS, Android, Have you ever had an idea for a children's book, but thought it would take too much to develop? Well, listen in as today's guest shares his experience with designing, developing, and publishing a children's book, and companion app for iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire. Take note of how he came up with the idea, how he developed the story, and what he does to keep the process fun. Be sure to check out his studio website and his children's book site for more details. Have questions?  Let's talk about them in the comments below. Thanks for watching, listening, rating and subscribing. Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com Charles McKeever no 24:08
Discusssing Beats, iPhone 6, Cloud, Google Glass, Fire TV on Mobile App Chat http://opensourcemarketer.com/12262/discusssing-beats-iphone-6-cloud-google-glass-fire-tv-mobile-app-chat/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12262/discusssing-beats-iphone-6-cloud-google-glass-fire-tv-mobile-app-chat/#comments Mon, 19 May 2014 17:35:06 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12262

Recently I hung out with a couple of my geek friends to talk about some of the technology and news of the day. Steve P. Young from the Mobile App Chat podcast hosted the conversation. If you haven’t listened to his podcast yet, check it out. What do you think about what we said? Let’s talk about it on the Open Source Marketer Facebook page. Thanks for sharing, Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com

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Recently I hung out with a couple of my geek friends to talk about some of the technology and news of the day. Steve P. Young from the Mobile App Chat podcast hosted the conversation. If you haven’t listened to his podcast yet, check it out.

What do you think about what we said?

Let’s talk about it on the Open Source Marketer Facebook page.

Thanks for sharing,

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

The post Discusssing Beats, iPhone 6, Cloud, Google Glass, Fire TV on Mobile App Chat appeared first on Open Source Marketer.

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12262/discusssing-beats-iphone-6-cloud-google-glass-fire-tv-mobile-app-chat/feed/ 0 AWS,Beats,Google Glass,iPhone 6 Recently I hung out with a couple of my geek friends to talk about some of the technology and news of the day. Steve P. Young from the Mobile App Chat podcast hosted the conversation. If you haven't listened to his podcast yet, check it out. - Recently I hung out with a couple of my geek friends to talk about some of the technology and news of the day. Steve P. Young from the Mobile App Chat podcast hosted the conversation. If you haven't listened to his podcast yet, check it out. What do you think about what we said? Let's talk about it on the Open Source Marketer Facebook page. Thanks for sharing, Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com Charles McKeever no 50:24
Using Badges to Analyze Communication Patterns http://opensourcemarketer.com/12255/using-badges-to-analyze-communication-patterns/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12255/using-badges-to-analyze-communication-patterns/#comments Mon, 05 May 2014 15:06:34 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12255

Are you tuned into what’s happening in wearable technology? If not, you might be missing business opportunities. SocioMetricSolutions has developed a social sensing employee badge that is capable of capturing face-to-face interactions, extracting social signals from speech and body movement, and measuring the proximity and relative location of users. The goal is to analyze work place social interactions to provide feedback to workers, which might sound scary at first, but what if this could be applied to group events like social gatherings, trade shows, meetings with client prospects? Imagine meeting with a prospective client, monitoring the conversation, and then getting...

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Are you tuned into what’s happening in wearable technology? If not, you might be missing business opportunities.

SocioMetricSolutions has developed a social sensing employee badge that is capable of capturing face-to-face interactions, extracting social signals from speech and body movement, and measuring the proximity and relative location of users.

The goal is to analyze work place social interactions to provide feedback to workers, which might sound scary at first, but what if this could be applied to group events like social gatherings, trade shows, meetings with client prospects?

Imagine meeting with a prospective client, monitoring the conversation, and then getting feedback on how it went? It might not guarantee that you’d secure that particular deal, but over time you’d be able to collect enough data from interactions to recognize a pattern.

Check the Socio Metric Solutions website for more details.

What other technologies interest you?

Let’s talk about it on the Open Source Marketer Facebook page.

Thanks for sharing,

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

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App Development Outsourcing with Digital Possum Director, Jack Liu http://opensourcemarketer.com/12194/app-development-outsourcing-digital-possum-jack-liu/ http://opensourcemarketer.com/12194/app-development-outsourcing-digital-possum-jack-liu/#comments Wed, 30 Apr 2014 14:46:16 +0000 http://opensourcemarketer.com/?p=12194

Have you ever had an idea for an app, but didn’t want to do the design work and write the code yourself? Well today’s guest is Jack Liu, Founder and Director of Digital Possum, a mobile gaming startup based in Washington DC. Jack shares how he started a game development studio and then outsourced the work to others in India and Argentina. Take note of Jack’s philosophy of working on the business, not in the business. Even though he has a background in programming, he chooses not to do the app development himself. You can learn more about Digital Possum...

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Have you ever had an idea for an app, but didn’t want to do the design work and write the code yourself? Well today’s guest is Jack Liu, Founder and Director of Digital Possum, a mobile gaming startup based in Washington DC. Jack shares how he started a game development studio and then outsourced the work to others in India and Argentina.

Take note of Jack’s philosophy of working on the business, not in the business. Even though he has a background in programming, he chooses not to do the app development himself.

You can learn more about Digital Possum on their website.

Have questions?  Let’s talk about them in the comments below.

Thanks for watching, listening, rating and subscribing.

Charles McKeever
OpenSourceMarketer.com

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http://opensourcemarketer.com/12194/app-development-outsourcing-digital-possum-jack-liu/feed/ 0 App Development,outsourcing,Startups Have you ever had an idea for an app, but didn't want to do the design work and write the code yourself? Well today's guest is Jack Liu, Founder and Director of Digital Possum, a mobile gaming startup based in Washington DC. Have you ever had an idea for an app, but didn't want to do the design work and write the code yourself? Well today's guest is Jack Liu, Founder and Director of Digital Possum, a mobile gaming startup based in Washington DC. Jack shares how he started a game development studio and then outsourced the work to others in India and Argentina. Take note of Jack's philosophy of working on the business, not in the business. Even though he has a background in programming, he chooses not to do the app development himself. You can learn more about Digital Possum on their website. Have questions?  Let's talk about them in the comments below. Thanks for watching, listening, rating and subscribing. Charles McKeever OpenSourceMarketer.com Charles McKeever no 26:52